Tag: David Bayus

Let’s Review…

Holy holy!  It’s the end of the year already and looking back through the past twelve months, I’m really impressed by how great the art and shows were, and also dismayed by how I forgot some of them. So, in case all y’alls have forgotten because of the barrage of great art you have encountered over the year, let’s review and savor one last time before the end of the world comes (it’ll be 2012, after all).

We began the year with As It Was Before, a two person show by Martin Machado and Todd Freeman with install by Aleksandra Zee.

Ghost Fish by Martin Machado

Ghost Fish by Martin Machado

Torch Lake by Todd Freeman

Torch Lake by Todd Freeman

Then on to February with the resin collage work of Sebastian Wahl‘s Kaleidoscope Eyes.

Kaleidoscope Eye 4 by Sebastian Wahl

Kaleidoscope Eye 4 by Sebastian Wahl

In March we had The Letter Collector which was a massive group show with all the artists showing their love of script and type.

Z by Eli Harris

Z by Eli Harris

S by Damon Macgregor

S by Damon Macgregor

With April came American Mythic, Peter Gronquist‘s use of ebay items and mixed media to create a variety of interesting and tongue-in-cheek works.

American Mythic by Peter Gronquist

American Mythic by Peter Gronquist

Robert Minervini‘s Sunken Dreams owned May with the geodesic domes settled in quiet dystopian landscapes.

Under the Influence of the Season by Robert Minervini

Under the Influence of the Season by Robert Minervini

June was a healthy serving of Bad Casserole, David Bayus‘ mixed media works.

That Museum Visit by David Bayus

That Museum Visit by David Bayus

July came with Lisa Congdon‘s Icelandic inspired works in Boreas with installation by Sarah Applebaum.

Antarctic Camper by Lisa Congdon

Antarctic Camper by Lisa Congdon

Extra Dimensional Quilt by Sarah Applebaum

Extra Dimensional Quilt by Sarah Applebaum

We had Gregory Ito‘s Point of Vision, an exploration in broadening his own perception on time for the whole of August.

As the Sun sets with Grace by Gregory Ito

As the Sun sets with Grace by Gregory Ito

Post-apocalyptic Sanguine Machine: Antedeluvian Artifacts from Futures Past by Beau Stanton presented us with creation/destruction in September.

Mortality Mask by Beau Stanton

Mortality Mask by Beau Stanton

Pakayla Biehn had October superimposed and double-exposed with her paintings in (t)here.

On and Ever Onward by Pakayla Biehn

On and Ever Onward by Pakayla Biehn

And last but not very least, we finish out the year with Scott Greenwalt‘s Alchemist, delving into what “change” really means.

Thousands of Years ago in the Future by Scott Greenwalt

Thousands of Years ago in the Future by Scott Greenwalt

Dang. That’s a lotta good art.

Who doesn’t love paper?

Collage art has increasingly become more and more popular. Obviously we’re big fans exhibiting artists such as David Bayus and Sebastian Wahl whose work is heavily based on collage. Take a look at five artists who work with assemblages of different forms to  create new beautiful compositions.

chad-kouri-foundpaperbook6

Chad Kouri spends most of his time in alleys looking for treasures to build out his found-art collages and illustrations. The rest of his time is spent writing emails to people he has never met and other things to pass the day.

CadKouri-drafting-cosmos

chad-kouri_desktopwallpaperprojectCadKouri_ladies

CadKouri-wilco-kicking-television

CadKouri-story-time

CadKouri- let-there-be-geo

Texas-raised artist Erik Parra‘s collage works prominently feature photographic images with an abiding retro aesthetic (probably because they appear to be actual old photographs), dappled with blobs or confetti-like clouds of color. The appealing result is vibrant and surprising, humorous but also a bit eerie, as colors creep into a black-and-white plane like so many stills from a forgotten, more austere version of Pleasantville (1998). – Sam Stander

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Renee Torres: “My inspiration for design is usually drawn from my love of photography and history. I am hugely drawn to traditional menswear from mid 1800s to 1980s, and like to incorporate details from historical costume through a modern silhouette. I love the romanticism of the past mixed with graphic, radiant, and natural images I find for a color story in fabrics. My creative process involved tons of research, collage, and in depth experimentation for textile design to create a golden story. Music and film also inform my process, as I’m always curiously finding new inspiration. To me, design is a curiousity and passion expressed in a functional object.”

Renee Torres

Renee Torres

Renee-Torres

Renee-Torres2

Renee-Torres3

Karen Kang‘s collages are created with recycled papers on pages taken from vintage books. The use of vibrant colors is important to her, as it contributes to the feeling of something new emerging from what has been discarded. She also creates art on book covers that are mounted onto recycled pieces of wood.

karenkang2

karenkang

While on his bedroom floor back in December 2002, artist Jack Azar experienced a moment of self-awakening. An already existing reality emerged with the aid of scissors and glue, used to combine magazine images and regarded today as his artwork medium.

Jack Azar Studios, Pretty Boy

Jack Azar Studios, Paradise Found

David Bayus top pick in The Examiner

Congratulations to David Bayus on the write up in yesterday’s Examiner on his solo exhibition, Bad Casserole. Here’s the scope in case you missed it.

sfexaminerDavidBayus

The New Guard

We received the latest issue of 7×7 Magazine yesterday and are pleased to be in company with new art galleries such as Baer Rigdgway, Ever Gold, Guerro Gallery and McLoughlin Gallery. As 7×7′s Allison McCarthy states, “Wake up: It’s art o’clock. We peek into five of the city’s newest galleries to find out what they’re showing, which local artists their watching, and how to start your own collection here and now.”

If you get a chance to pick up the July 2011 issue, make sure to check out The New Guard feature on Gallery Hijinks, page 60.

7x7

Bad Casserole Teaser Video

Take a walk through a day with David Bayus as he documents his processes of sculpting, photography, digital media, and painting.

Video by Casey Gray and edited by Jesse Chandler.

Interview: David Bayus

We recently had the opportunity to talk with artist, David Bayus on his upcoming solo exhibition, Bad Casserole. David’s work is out of this world! Check out what he has to say about his new collection.

Whitney Lasker: Can you talk to us about your upcoming show “Bad Casserole” and the an concept and/or theme?

David Bayus: This body of work focuses on my own desire to develop a personal non-linear narrative based on the excessive, material nature of our existence while using a visual language that I feel best represents that existence. We view objects and images simultaneously as both literal documentative subjects and as representations of personal or cultural meaning. This osculation between the documentative and the representational is the basis of approach to each piece in the show.

The title for the show “Bad Casserole” comes from the title of an early work I did using the mixed media process that I use now. Bad Casserole seemed like a fitting show title.

David Bayus DOUBLE HAPPINESSDOUBLE HAPPINESS by David Bayus

WL: How do you decide what textures and content you are going to work with?

DB: A large part of the initial process is intuitive, I’ll see an object that catches my attention or I’ll sculpt something that hits the right notes. When I assemble the individual objects together, a narrative emerges, albeit an intentionally non-linear one. From there, the rest of the competition and the final image are centered around that narrative.

WL: Tell us about the materials you use in your art?

DB: Keeping the material qualities of the imagery is important. This aesthetic lends itself to the history of craft; the creation of objects from other objects.

WL: How do you think technology has changed painting?

DB: I think the current advancements in technology are informing painting to a similar degree that photography did when it was invented. The difference being that photography presented us with the documented reality of objects, while the advancements we have today with computer rendering programs for visual media, advances in printing, and the increasing fluidity of digital images themselves; are creating space for new approaches to be considered, I think artists are starting to look at digital media not just as a conceptual basis for making art, but as simply the best tool for the job if needed.

I think digital media has had a more direct influence on photography than its had on painting. The overall result I think is movement towards a merging of disciplines that I think is really exciting. Painting will always have an important role to play. Its singular, performative, and ultimately representational. Photography is reproductive, mechanical, and ultimately documentative. Digital media moves between these qualities freely, but is ultimately synthetic. Painting has qualities that are specific only unto itsef, which is why I like to use all three mediums, not as a conceptual basis, but for thier distinct qualities as images.

PORTFOLIO-THATMUSEUMVISIT

That Museum Visit by David Bayus

WL: You mentioned in a past interview that you where saving up for a camera. Can you tell us about this camera and how it has changed your work?

DB: The purchase of my Canon EOS 5d Mark II is probably the most imporant thing to happen to my art practice since I learned how to paint. Before I had my camera, I was using found imagery for digital collages. I was at the whim of whatever I could find that worked for what I wanted to do. Using my own photography has opened up avenues for creating a new visual language, it allows me to control every aspect of the composition, and gives me the ability to add a layer of representation into the objects being photographed that was impossible before. The change in my work after I finally got my hands on that camera has been dramatic.

SPILLAGE by David BayusSPILLAGE by David Bayus

WL: What is your process from start to finish for each of your pieces?

DB: It generally starts by walking around my apartment, then out into stores, walking the aisles of Safeway, looking for any object (usually utilitarian in function) that catches my eye. After that I’ll bring the objects home and begin creating a narrative. I’ll sculpt objects out of colored paper, clay, colored sticks, food, etc. based on expanding that narrative. After I have a complete composition, I’ll separate each object to be documented. I’ll use different lighting techniques to create atmosphere and photograph each object with my camera. After I’ve uploaded the photos onto the computer, I put the images back together, and then print the final composition and mount it to panel. Then, I’ll mount the panel to stretcher bars and seal the print to get it ready for painting. The painting process is significant because it brings the singular back into the final image. There’s a contrast that occurs when a painting and a photograph are placed together that I’ve always been drawn to. The documentative and the representational. I try to bring that contrast to the lowest point possible by painting the same object that is photographed in a realistic manner. Trying to get the different mediums as close together as possible. But there will allways be that contrast. I want it to be there. Its like two people showing up to a party wearing the same outfit.

WL: What other artist do you think your work draws a parallel with?

DB: I was turned on to the work of Czech Animator Jan Svankmajer this past fall. His animated short “Dimensions of Dialogue” is one of the greatest things Ive ever seen, and instantly drew parallels to my own work.

Jan Svankmajer

WL: Color seems to play a large role in your work, please explain the current palate in your recent work.

DB: Well, I think if your a visual artist and your not working in black and white, then color should be an important part of your work! I look at color as a way of creating compositional lines, emphasizing certain areas or making others low key. I approach the color choices in my work based on the local color; whats present in the photography. If I need something to jump out I’ll use a complementary color scheme (i.e. turquoise and orange) and if I want something to sit back I’ll use an analogous or tertiary color scheme.

WL: If you had to describe your work in 5 words what would they be (not a sentence)?

DB: Sculptural. Visceral. Synthetic. Funk. Funk. I like Funk. Can I use Funk twice?

THE DECAPATATION OF by David BayusTHE DECAPATATION OF by David Bayus

WL: How does your artwork make you feel? How do you think your viewers will feel when you see your collection?

DB: I think a piece is sucessful when I look at it and think that it looks like the description of experiences that I cant put into words. The work is intentionally non-linear an non-illustrative so that each viewer will have different feelings when they look at a piece. I don’t know what viewers will feel when they look at my work, but I know that it will be different than what I feel, and I love that.

Bad Casserole by David Bayus

David Bayus DOUBLE HAPPINESS

Opening: June 4th 2011, 6-10pm

June 4th 2011 to June 25th 2011

Gallery Hijinks is proud to present Bad Casserole a collection of mixed media works by David Bayus. In his first solo exhibition the artist focuses on his desire to develop a personal non-linear narrative based on the excessive material nature of his own experience. His work employs a unique visual language that utilizes the inherent implications of sculpture, photography, digital media, and traditional painting techniques. Please join us for the opening reception on June 4th, 2011 from 6-10pm.

Bayus’ process begins with creating assemblages of both found and sculpted objects drawn from his environment. This aesthetic lends itself to the history of craft and our relationship to functional and utilitarian objects. He then photographs the individual components of the assemblage with different lighting techniques to create varying atmospheres. Afterwards he digitally montages the images together and prints the final composition onto panel.

Using traditional painting techniques, Bayus adds a final layer of singular representation to the work by painting the same object that is photographed. This contrast between the documented and the representational, the painted image and the print; completes the process by bringing the image to a point of unified tension. The inherent contrasting qualities of each medium are brought together to form a unified narrative of personal experience.

The exhibition Bad Casserole offers viewers a rare look at an intriguing and highly individual artist. The exhibition opens June 4th, 2011 and will be on display until June 25th, 2011 and is open to the public.

David Bayus in NY based Nu-Mode Magazine!

We are excited about David Bayus‘ upcoming show titled “Bad Casserole” opening this June. Nu-Mode Magazine just released their current issue featuring an eight page spread and interview about David’s current work. Pick up a copy to read the article at your local bookstore. David Bayus is thrilled to incorporate his own photography and oil paintings at his first solo exhibition at Gallery Hijinks. Click on the spread below to see the digital version of the Spring Rebellion.

The Letter Collector Teaser

We proudly  present The Letter Collector, and exhibition of over 50 artists. This massive group show is based on our common love of type and script. The viewer will experience an assortment of letters expressed through a range of mediums: drawing, painting, photography, neon, sculpture, video and mixed media. Please join us for the opening reception this Saturday, March 5th, 2011 from 6-10pm at Gallery Hijinks!

Exhibiting artists include: Aaron Bo Heimlich, Alexandra ZeeAndrea Wan, Andrew Johnson, Andrew McCintockAustin McManusBeau StantonCasey GrayCatherine Ryan, Chris BlackstockChristian Rex Van MinnenChristopher DavisonClaire Colette, Cora Lanzisero, Damon MacGregor, David BayusDenise SantillanDustin KlienEli HarrisEric HelveErik OttoErik ParaFernando PizarroHannah StoufferJakub KalousekJason VivonaJing WeiJon Contino, Kyle Jorgensen, Lafe Eaves, Lisa CongdonLouise ChenMark Warren JacquesMatthew ReamerMeryl PatakyMike GiantMolly BosleyMorgan BlairNas ChompasPakayla BiehnTimothy KarpinskiRich PellegrinoRobert MinerviniRosie HannaRussell LengRyan De La HozRyan Riss, Sarah Patterson, Sean Somers, Seth NeefusShea Greene, Tanya Behar, Uri Korn, Whitney Lasker, Viktor Layne, and Yellena James.



The Letter Collector

the letter collector

March 5th- March 27th, 2011

Opening Reception: March 5, 2011 from 6-10pm

With over 50 artists from across North America, Gallery Hijinks is proud to present The Letter Collector. This exhibition aims to simulate the distinctive styles, shapes, and mediums of an antique collection of letterpress type, in the form of contemporary art. Please join us for the opening reception on March 5th, 2011, from 6-10pm.

The Letter Collector is curated with the intention to exhibit both emerging and established artists in one massive group show based on the common love of type and script. Stemming from immensely different backgrounds, each artist creates their unique translation of a letter in the alphabet. The viewer will experience an assortment of letters expressed through a range of mediums: drawing, painting, photography, neon, wood, relief sculpture, and mixed media.

Exhibiting artists include: Aaron Bo Heimlich, Alexandra ZeeAndrea Wan, Andrew Johnson, Austin McManusBeau StantonCasey GrayCatherine Ryan, Chris BlackstockChristian Rex Van MinnenChristopher DavisonClaire Colette, Damon MacGregor, David BayusDenise SantillanDustin KlienEli HarrisEric HelveErik OttoFernando PizarroHannah StoufferJakub KalousekJason VivonaJing WeiJon Contino, Kyle Jorgensen, Lafe Eaves, Lisa CongdonLouise ChenMark Warren JacquesMatthew ReamerMeryl PatakyMike GiantMolly BosleyMorgan BlairNas ChompasPakayla BiehnTimothy KarpinskiRich PellegrinoRobert MinerviniRosie HannaRussell LengRyan De La HozRyan Riss, Sarah Patterson, Sean Somers, Seth NeefusShea Greene, Tanya Behar, Uri Korn, Whitney Lasker, Whitney McCabe, Viktor Layne, and Yellena James.


The Letter Collector will be on display from March 5th, 2011 until March 26th, 2011, and is open to the public during gallery hours (11am-6pm Tuesday-Saturday).

Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
All content & imagery are copyright © Gallery Hijinks 2014 & its artists.
Join our Mailing List: