Tag: drawing

Coming Up!

New Works by Randy Colosky

On Exhibit: April 7th-April 28th, 2012

Opening Reception: April 7th, 2012 from 6-10pm

New Works by Randy Colosky opens in Gallery Hijinks this April 2012. In addition to Colosky’s solo exhibtion, the backroom of the gallery will feature Colosky’s own selection of other artists’ works. His solo exhibition features a continuation in his exploration in his “Nondeterministic Algorithm” series of seven featured ink drawings on paper. These drawings are made by drawing ellipses and rectangles repeatedly to create a free-formed vortex of architectural design, texture, and space. The opening reception will take place on April 7th, 2012 from 6pm-10pm.

In Randy Colosky’s practice he often takes an object or materials that would typically have a utilitarian purpose and alters its function to generate a new aesthetic language or optical information. For New Works, Colosky’s pen and ink drawings are made with pattern templates that are modeled after architectural templates used in drafting. The template sets up a set of rules in the drawing, however he chooses the specific direction of each iteration of the template. This allows him to actively participate in the drawing process yet he never fully comprehend what the drawing will ultimately look like. These drawings are a symbolic of Colosky’s manner of meditation in that the more he trains his mind to become aware of each moment he experiences and the changes between them, the more he finds that he is able to realize an existence that is more present in the moment and simpler to navigate.

Although trained in traditional ceramics and building construction, Colosky’s interest in process, function, and subtle wit are what drives the scope of his mediums to vary from drawing, sculpture, design, collage, and installation. For New Works his exploration in traditional means of pen and ink work is a unique direction in connection to his past works of atypical material. Yet, his process of altering the conventional usage of architectural templates allow this work to remain in the same vein of his past work and interest in challenging established visual language.

Previously based in San Francisco, Colosky now lives and works in Oakland. He received his BFA in ceramics from Kansas City Art Institute and has recently exhibited in the Museum of Craft and Folk Art. In the last few years he’s exhibited at Chandra Cerrito Contemporary, Incline Gallery, Adobe Books Back Room, ATA Left Window Gallery, Gallery Extrana, Ampersand International Arts, Southern Exposure, The Lab, Kavi Gupta Gallery, Hallway Bathroom Gallery, Low Gallery, Hosfelt Gallery, Savage Art Resources, White Box Gallery, and Alston Skirt Gallery, and previous publications in The Universe, the SF Chronicle, No New Enemies, and My Love For You. 
The backroom artists which Colosky has selected are as follows:
Kristina Lewis
Helen Lee
Andy Vogt
Alison O.K. Frost
Jesse Houlding
Ajit Chauhan
Clare Sydalowski
Amanda Hughen
Phil Mcgaughy

New Works by Randy Colosky is on exhibit April 7th through April 28th, 2012 at Gallery Hijinks located at 2309 Bryant Street, San Francisco CA 94110. For more information on Randy Colosky please contact visit our media kit or email us at info@galleryhijinks.com.


An Interview With Matthew Craven

For the duration of FRGMNTS (February 4th – February 25th, 2012) we will posting short excerpts of interviews held with Matthew Craven as well as photos and recordings about his new work. Keep checking back for more!

Here’s our first question…

GH: Have you always been a pattern person?  Especially with your past work dealing with Native Americans, it sometimes looks and feels like your weaving a blanket (such as “Life Totem”).  Is this meditative process?  What draws you to this as an artist? 

MC: Yeah, I have always been a pattern person.  As a kid I would relentlessly draw/doodle/deface pretty much anything in front of me.  It was only as I got older that I focused that energy into something more engaging and thoughtful.  As a result i have been including many cultural reference into my work in the last few years ( i.e. the native American/masonic  influence in previous work). The Life and Death Totem drawings were a result of wanting to take what had been doing for years to the next level.  I have always found peace in drawing.  The repetitive nature of such work is very meditative and satisfying to my soul.

Interview questions by Veronica Schaible

Interview: Scott Greenwalt

As I try to wrap my head around the works of Scott Greenwalt I continuously find myself spiraling into a mind trip of gore, patterns and the grotesque beauty of these large scale portraits and lanscapes. In an effort to understand the artist intentions and purpose behind the works, we sat down to interview Scott and pick his brain on inspiration, process, history and the psychology of his new collection of works, Alchemist.

Gallery Hijinks: What inspired and motivated your new body of work?

Scott Greenwalt: The last 37 years of life on planet Earth.

Following-Our-Discussion-Last-Winter

GH: Controlled chaos seems to play a role in your paintings, where compositions flow into strange and unexpected directions. Please explain the artistic process.

SG: For quite some time I have been obsessed with depicting action in new ways. A major component of the germination of my ideas is simply time. I usually spend about six months on any one painting from start to finish. I work on several paintings at a time and spend a lot of time just sitting with them, individually as well as grouped together, looking into them to find what they need next. It’s a slow building of incremental growth and change. If everything is comprised of infinitesimal parts in constant motion, how does everything keep from intermingling? My work concerns an alternate dimension where plants, minerals, animals, electrical charges, ectoplasmic effluvium, atmospheric conditions all come together momentarily and form a new being, then move apart into reformed organisms. This process continues infinitely, without ever stabilizing.

Spectral Unfolding by Scott Greenwalt

GH: Do you have an initial idea for the piece, do you sketch or does it just flow from you in an organic way?

SG: I usually have a really vague idea at the outset what the overall form and color scheme will be. Once I actually start painting, the various components build off of one another and later weave back through each other. The paintings are generally grounded in traditional formats of landscape and portraiture. That sets up a loose structure to experiment within. Then I just make shit up as I go along.

GH: Please explain the philosophy behind the portraits? What are some of the inspirations and why?

SG: One of the initial inspirations for the large portraits were the large black and white paintings by Chuck Close. I had been fascinated with them since first seeing “Keith” as a kid at the St. Louis Art Museum. One day, about a year ago, I stood before some of his large works from the last several decades, but I could not take my eyes off one particular portrait. What captivated me was the handling of the subject’s chapped and weathered lips. The more I looked, the more broken down and abstract it appeared, comprised of jagged little triangle forms. This was before his spinal artery collapse and resulting change of approach, but there were the same things going on in those lips that manifested on a looser, more abstract level in his later work. Since I don’t work directly from reference material most of the time, I am faced with the challenge of abstracting something that didn’t exist yet. Rather than breaking down an existing image into abstract units, I am trying to herd disparate abstract units into an understandable, yet alien image.

"Keith" by Chuck Close

"Keith" by Chuck Close

Francis Bacon’s work has been the richest source of inspiration and frustration. How does one go about deconstructing the nature of the human animal, modern life on earth and the history of painting in the wake of such masterful handling of the subject? This problem can keep me up at night. I also spend countless hours ruminating on the work of Hieronymus Bosch.

"Self Portrait" by Francis Bacon

"Self Portrait" by Francis Bacon

"Portrait of Michel Leris" by Francis Bacon

"Portrait of Michel Leris" by Francis Bacon

Detail of "Christ in Limbo" by Hieronymus Bosch

Detail of "Christ in Limbo" by Hieronymus Bosch

Then there is my obsession with the work of special make-up effects artists Rick Baker and Rob Bottin. Growing up watching sci-fi and horror films, mostly from the 80s, was a tremendous influence on everything that I have done artistically. Bottin’s work on John Carpenter’s The Thing may have been the single biggest influence on the way I look at the world.

MIB special effects by Rick Baker

MIB special effects by Rick Baker

GH: How do the paper pieces with wood glue fit into the equation?

SG: I’m interested in what happens to an iconic image after the icon becomes obscured. What happens to the human face when layers build up and obscure the features beyond recognition? If the human head suffers a massive physical trauma, the swelling that results can distort and obscure the signature forms of a once recognizable face. In time, the swelling reduces, the wounds heal and the body returns to it’s normal state. Though a significant transformation has occurred, often scar tissue will be the only visible artifact of this change. With this work, I am concerned with the manufactured transformation that transpires when semi-translucent layers are built up, slowly swallowing up any distinguishing characteristics into an ectoplasmic goo, leaving the remaining robes to swaddle the amorphous slime.

Vaporous Mold Spore with Pearl Earring (after Vermeer)

Vaporous Mold Spore with Pearl Earring (after Vermeer)

GH: The dark, rich, color palate (i.e. red drapes, black backgrounds, earth tones) versus the bright, even neon colors both play an equal part in this collection. Please explain your reasons for using these very different hues and how you’ve made them work together?

SG: For the last few years I had started all of my paintings on a black background to eliminate context. They were like organisms floating within a void. Over time, this void became more densely populated and space began to form. In outer space, each chemical gas reflects a distinct color. As these organisms become more complex in ever expanding space, more chemical reactions take place, generating stranger wavelengths of light.

Seventeen Minutes Prior to This Exact Moment by Scott Greenwalt

Seventeen Minutes Prior to This Exact Moment by Scott Greenwalt

GH: How is art history incorporated into the body of work?

SG: I think about the history of painting, it’s evolution through the centuries, and it’s contemporary potential as a relevant means of expression on a daily basis. I guess, like any revision of history, my vantage is skewed toward my own idiosyncratic aesthetic preferences. I borrow what is useful or interesting to me and generally ignore the rest.

GH: What are five words that would describe your art?

SG: that shit is fucked up.

Video: Alchemist by Scott Greenwalt

Check out this studio visit with Scott Greenwalt as he prepares for his solo exhibition, Alchemist, at Gallery Hijinks opening November 12th, from 6-10pm and on display until December 17th, 2011.

Shot and edited by Jesse Chandler. Music by Scott Greenwalt.

What’s new with Mark Warren Jacques

mark warren jacques art studio

A new studio and the beginnings of some big paintings, our pal Mark Warren Jacques gears up for his solo show at White Walls this December. Additionally he will be guest curating a group exhibition in March 2012 at Gallery Hijinks based on COLOR.

Studio Visit: Scott Greenwalt

Last week we took a trip to visit Scott Greenwalt in his Oakland art studio. We caught him in the midst of preparing for his upcoming solo exhibition titled Alchemist, opening November 2011 at Gallery Hijinks.

The works have a sense of chaos, grotesque, scientific phenomenon combined with a mutation of both uncertain origin and destiny. Check out some snapshots we grabbed of the works in progress ranging from small paper pieces to large paintings on wood panel and canvas.

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Scott Greenwalt Gallery Hijinks Studio Visit

Art Review & Opening Reception Photos

We just received some great photographs of the opening reception of Boreas. It was the warmest night of the year and everyone was in good spirits. We are also happy to share a review of Boreas by Lisa Congdon and Sarah Applebaum by the Art Business contributors.

Review by Clare Coppel: “Boreas,” a show with pretty cool window installations by Sarah Applebaum and mixed media/paintings by Lisa Congdon features three of my favorite guilty hipster/nerd pleasures– neon, geometric prints inspired by indiginous peoples, and cute furry animals. “Ooooh cute animals, nope can’t hate on that.” At least I didn’t wear that Navajo print sweatshirt or I’d match the work on the walls, though this work is inspired by Icelandic stuff– snow not desert. I’ve always wanted to go to Iceland. I want a new tattoo, maybe a cute furry animal? Is there neon tattoo ink? For um, geometric patterns?
Review by Mairead O’Connor: Lisa Congdon creates paintings and collges that illustrate Icelandic folk culture and four seasons. She focuses on pattern, animals, and the changing light of the sun. Sarah Applebaum’s work is made up of geometric shapes colored in the grey scale between black and white. Her large installations are actually hand sewn and symbolic.
Review by RWM: Great trip to the North. Not just a trip to the cold beautiful lands, but also to their people, transformed by their surroundings. The cold wild is outside, but also within. Enjoy both colors and shapes. Impressive. Emotions are captured here in window sculptures as well.

Here are a few snapshots of the opening reception. To see more photos of the opening check out Art Business Gallery Reviews.

Lisa Congdon artist art

Sarah Applebaum artistSarah Applebaum window installation. Image by Allan Bamberger

Photo

Birdseye view – art by Sarah Applebaum & Lisa Congdon. Image by Mairead O’Connor

Gallery Hijinks

Window installation

Altea Kloyd and Lauren Lanzisero

gallery hijinks

friends at gallery hijinks

babies enven like the art

Joe Lumbroso

gallery hijinks

gallery hijinks

Point of Vision new works by Gregory Ito

Point-of-Vision-postcard-front

On Exhibit: August 6th – August 27th, 2011

Opening Reception: August 6th, 2011 from 6-10pm

Gallery Hijinks is proud to present Point of Vision, a collection of painting, sculpture, and installation by Gregory Ito. In this new body of work Gregory continues his exploration of the concept of time, broadening his focus from lunar cycles to the cycle of a day, or rather everyday, from dawn to dusk and back again. Please join us for the opening reception on August 6th, 2011 from 6-10pm.

Throughout our humanly existence, time is depicted through the sequenced deconstruction of the constant relationship between night and day. The relationship we hold with the Sun, Moon, and Earth has been an evolution of ideas that continues to the days of contemporary society. The tools we use to define time have changed from Stone Hedge to the modern day calendar.

Gregory Ito’s current body of work is a reflection of human perception of these shifts presented through the mediums of painting, sculpture, and installation. The images he creates depict new ways to visually understand the concept of time, and use the celestial forms: Sun, Moon, and Earth, as reference points to the relationships that are discussed within each piece. The body of work carries this dialogue of our human connection with the linear progression forward into the future.

The atmosphere of a space also plays a crucial role in the presentation of ideas like these. Awnings and shrine like architecture is present in many installations, to aid in the construction of sacred space. Sacred space is commonly used to house ideas that are much larger than our collective consciousness, and are extremely difficult to grasp. Ito’s constructions of sacred space are intended to contain the concept of time and the ideas related that shift our human perception of time, and create new avenues of understanding.

“My work is my intention to transcend an individual to a basic way of looking at the world we live in, and the universe we are part of. I hope to reveal the value and power we have to seek the true reasons we are living for. It is to inspire people to grow together.” -Gregory Ito

Gregory received his BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2008. He is Co-Founder of the Ever Gold Gallery, and Co-Founder/Editor of The San Francisco Arts Quarterly (SFAQ). He currently works and lives in San Francisco.

Point of Vision opens August 6th and runs through August 27th, 2011 and is open to the public. For more information on the exhibition or Gregory Ito please email us at info@galleryhijinks.com.

New Prints by Lisa Congdon

Check out Lisa Congdon‘s new prints at our online shop! Archival prints of original pencil drawings, available in 8.5″ x 11″ & 11″ x 14″.

standingguardStanding Guard

dothethingDo The Thing

hereandnowHere and Now

st_basilsSt. Basil’s

vintage_eddymerckxVintage Eddy Merckx

Studio Vist with Gregory Ito

Last week we stopped by Gregory Ito’s art studio in the SOMA district of San Francisco. We took a quick peek as he builds a new collection of work titled Point of Vision opening this August 2011. The body of work comprised of paintings, sculpture, and installation are very much influenced by the concept of time, and use the celestial forms: Sun, Moon, and Earth. “My work is my intention to transcend an individual to a basic way of looking at the world we live in, and the universe we are part of. I hope to reveal the value and power we have to seek the true reasons we are living for.  It is to inspire people to grow together.”-Gregory Ito

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Luna the cat.

Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
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