Tag: graffiti

Artist Feature: Lelo

João Lelo, an artist from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil has just released a short clip capturing the process of his most recent mural outside of Galeria Choque Cultural in São Paulo. Check out the video below, I especially like the heavy use of patterns and bright, bold colors in his work.

photoGaleria Choque Cultural in São Paulo

Lelo

“His work, which used to be a strong reflection of his childhood influences such as cartoons and videogames, has matured through the study of artists – mostly from the art nouveau and cubism movements – into a world of human or animal images morphing into each other in an extremely surreal way. His goal is to create a modern mythology in perfect connection with the urban everyday life.” – http://www.leloart.com/

rainha_marI really love this piece titled Queen of the Sea. Collage and acrylics on canvas.

Mi Bandida by LeloMi Bandida, Latex and spraypaint on wall. Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

photo-7So perfect I can’t find no double, Latex and spraypaint on wall. Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Untitled Mural by Lelo

Wolf / King Rio de JaneiroWolf/King, Rio de Janeiro

All hail my hands by LeloAll hail my hands, Latex and spraypaint on wall. Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Queen/Bird by LeloQueen/Bird, Latex and spraypaint on wall. Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Robert Minervini: Sunken Dreams Video

As a busy weekend approaches of art auctions, exhibitions, and events, we’ve spotlighted a San Francisco artist who’s taken the surrounding environment and translated it into beautiful paintings for his solo exhibition titled Sunken Dreams. Check out what Robert Minervini has to say about his influences, views on art and upcoming exhibition.

Please join us for the opening reception on May 7th, 2011 from 6-11pm.

Video By Third Street Works.

Artist Feature: DIA

This Friday, May 6th, is a pretty awesome art show featuring new works by one of our local favorites, Sean Sommers, aka DIA, at  Eli’s Mile High CLub. The event starts at 7pm and goes late with 80?s and 90?s dance featuring Dj Handsome Neto and Dj Grace.

(click on image for high res)

eli's_showcard

“Dia was born in New York, but has been traveling his entire life since the age of five. Living in NYC, Long Island, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, various parts of the Caribbean, Utah, Colorado, Seattle, California, and traveling many other places. Seeing the wide spectrum of culture at a young age had made a profound impact on him as an observer and forced a maladjusted view on many things. Never really being embedded in a stable family, living, or education system made it clear to him that experience is the greatest teacher. His interests in art making were evident early in his life mostly with music. His uncle who was a Tango singer would play songs on the guitar and while living in Puerto Rico he had been playing the piano around age six and started playing guitar around the age of eleven. He enjoys composing music based on discovery in non-conventional genres and exploration.

thepot,kettle,&audiosynthet

His interest in illustration and street art started around the age of 9 when he would collect comic books, skateboard, and draw on the desks in classes just to see what others would ad to what he had wrote. Since then it has evolved into painting large scale murals in the street, works and installations exhibited in galleries, and personal projects.

murals

He had attended school in western Washington at a small art college and excelled in illustration/painting. His style of painting credits influences by parallels found in Art Nouveau, History, the science of sound, Native Americans, punk ideals, and especially Nature and Humanity. He had begun painting and assembling with found objects and discovered working with wood panels and warm tones was most intriguing.

seansomers

gemeni

His synthesis of art making focuses on a great deal of figurative work, sound, experiences reflecting life and the human condition. The beautiful and horrific, the positive and negative, the vices of human behavior, empathy, and sincerity.”- Artist Biography written by Sean Somers.

sf

chp.11

MOCA according to DFW Cab

Last week the BKF crew was escorted to Art in the Streets at MOCA by the trusty DFW Cab (aka ‘the tagger taxi’). According to pretty much everybody the exhibition was out of this world and deemed the best street exhibition EVER. Check out a few road trip pictures from SqueakyCleanDave’s flickr stream.

the tagger taxi

road trip

arrived at mocaPerfect parking spot in front of MOCA.

ice cream truck

“Art in the Streets is the first major U.S. museum survey of graffiti and street art. Curated by MOCA Director Jeffrey Deitch and Associate Curators Roger Gastman and Aaron Rose, the exhibition will trace the development of graffiti and street art from the 1970s to the global movement it has become today, concentrating on key cities such as New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, London, and Sao Paulo, where a unique visual language or attitude has evolved.”- MOCA

materials

WOW

best museum exhibition ever!

The Warholian reviews American Mythic

The Warholian just posted their review of American Mythic exhibition by Peter Gronquist! Along with some very nice words about the exhibition, Mike Cuffe exposes some interesting facts about Peter work in an exclusive interview.

Peter Gronquist

I’m interested in what would seem to be America’s collective view of itself, sort of an imaginary collection of macho icons that are by themselves supposedly patriotic, but when combined create something completely ridiculous. I like the idea that all of these “American” ideals: guns, gold, excess, taxidermy, hunting, titties, red meat, whatever, can come together to achieve a parody narrative of our history and culture. It’s funny because I’m sort of mocking these things, yet I completely love all of these things. I find that most of my work boils down to me mocking myself. I’m fully aware that the shit I love is retarded. – Peter Gronquist

Read the entire review and interview at The Warholian.

Designer Weapons

Pete and friends

Sunken Dreams

Sunken Dreams new works by Robert Minervini

Sunken Dreams_web

Gallery Hijinks proudly presents Sunken Dreams, a solo exhibition by Robert Minervini. The paintings in this new body of work are inspired by the history of the geodesic dome and are a continuation of the artist’s urban landscapes exploring utopian and dystopian environments. Please join us for the opening reception on May 7th, 2011 from 6-10pm.

The word Utopia originates from the literal Greek meaning “non place,” suggesting that perfection can only exist in the realm of imagination. Minervini’s work presents invented spaces that are based on reality, but revel in artificiality.  In these desolate dreamlike non-places, the artist subverts nature and constructs or destroys architectural sites alluding to the making of a utopian and/or dystopian environment.

“Sunken Dreams” suggests the potential futility of aspiring for a better future in the face of humanity’s self-destructiveness.   The inspiration for this series comes from the life and work of R. Buckminster Fuller who had, among other things, popularized the geodesic dome. Fuller had a vision for a utopian future, one which he saw as attainable through the innovation and implementation of science and engineering.  Fuller’s iconic dome structure was the pinnacle of his design and by implementing them into this body of work, the artist hopes to make a connection between Fuller’s ideologies through symbolically utilizing his structures.

Minervini draws reference from an archive of photographs both personal and researched in order to construct the environments within each composition. With this framework he then utilizes innovative painting techniques to create layer upon layer of depth and texture. Vibrant colors remove the image from its reality and call attention to the origin of the digital image. “While I am interested in the process of working from digitally processed imagery, I place a strong emphasis on spontaneity, materiality, and revealing the painting process.” The end result is an image where abandoned landscapes stretch to the horizon and vast ruins of urban decay slowly crumble under the beauty of a pastel sunset.

Robert Minervini received his MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2009, and his BFA from Tyler School of Art in 2005. His work has been exhibited nationally including Marine Contemporary, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Eleanor Harwood Gallery, The Brooklyn Historical Society, the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, and the Pennsylvania State Museum. He has been awarded the Murphy/Cadogan Fellowship by the San Francisco Foundation in 2008, and the Edwin Austin Abbey Mural Fellowship by the National Academy of Fine Arts in 2008. He has been a resident artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Root Division Studio Program. His work has been published in New American Painting No.91, and Mural Art: Large Scale Art from Walls Around the World.

Sunken Dreams opens May 7th, 2011 and will be on display until May 28th, 2011 and is open to the public.

Dome2_web

Studio Visit: Erik Otto

I’ve known Erik Otto for a number of years and have always been amazed by his work. It seems he bears his heart on the canvas. Bright colors, organic forms, dripping paint and an ever evolving concept in his work has made him a popular artist for number of publications, residencies and exhibitions nation wide. Recently we went over to his art studio to check up on a few things he has lined up for this year.

Erik OttoErik Otto in his Mission art studio.

shared warehouseErik shares a warehouse space with these artist who work with a variety a mediums including sewing, photography and woodwork.

woodshopHe’s also crafted a wood shop which he’s currently using to construct a glass house.

glass house

glass house detail

Erik Otto

Every single thing inside Erik’s studio has been reclaimed, mainly from his residence time at the SF Dump: from his paint, brushes, and wood panels to his flat files, tools and electronics.

inside the studio

paint

shelves of art stuff

materials

detail of painting

studio

how it all begins

brushes

detail shot

caps

paint brushes

paint cans

studioThe studio has a beautiful view of the Mission District from Potrero Hill to Bernal Heights.

Potrero Hill

Bernal Heights

erik and his workOtto’s most recent work has been focused on the idea of opposing forces, light vs. dark, color vs. monochrome, and so on. The current collection has a repetitive them of circles, which really to draw the eye in.

four panel painting

detail

light vs. dark

O This painting is available on our online shop.

work table

Erik OttoThank you Erik for inviting us over for a delightful visit. We love you!!!

To learn more about Erik Otto visit his website at erikotto.com.

Interview: Peter Gronquist

Our amazing intern, Whitney Lasker, recently interviewed artist Peter Gronquist about his upcoming show titled American Mythic opening this Saturday April 2nd, 2011. Check out what these guys had to say about inspiration, process and all that bling!

dear_mailer_webWhitney Lasker: What is the overall concept of the show going to be? And what kinds of work might we expect from you?

Peter Gronquist: There’s not usually a full cohesive concept to any of my shows except for the very specific gun shows or taxidermy shows.  The American Mythic refers to my use of elements in my work that I feel are Awesomely American. Rams head with gold plated m-16 assault rifles, or bambi with a cruise missile strapped to its back.  Things that would give Glenn Beck a boner basically. Also will be new paintings and hello kitty hand grenades, in gold or chrome.

peterart_003

WL: How will this show be different from your other shows?

PG: It will be different in that it will have all new stuff.  There will also be a lot of differently priced work, from really affordable to really not affordable.

WL: Can you please describe the taxidermy sculpture process, do you kill then stuff the animals your self? I heard you use real guns to gold plate? Is that true and how does one do that?

PG: I don’t actually do the taxidermy part myself.  I usually find the animals on ebay.  Once I get them I remove the horns and brace the head if needed.  Then I form new antlers with wire armature and then finish them with epoxy clay. I usually sand them for like 50 hours, then they get shipped to LA for gold plating.  For the taxidermy pieces I do not use real guns because they are too heavy.  For the fashion pieces I use real guns for the most part.  That involves aquiring the guns, disassembly, mirror polishing each piece and then sending it in for gold plating.  It is more boring than it sounds if that is possible.

02

WL: Do you think any of your pieces belong in a museum if so which ones?

PG: I actually had a piece in a museum for a while.  It was the gazelle piece with the ak47 chrome antlers and was about 15′ across.  It was only temporary though, but I think it belonged there.  I love that piece.

gazelleguns

WL: To me your paintings seem very different from your sculptures what’s going on in your mind when you trying to make a painting vs. when you are making a sculptures?

PG: Yeah they are two seperate worlds.  I love painting, its something that i just do to do.  I think that when I start painting I dont usually have as refined of a concept, because to me its more about the act of painting, whereas the sculpting is more of a means to an end.  I like sculpting a lot, but its not like painting.

verse_002-2_op_800x266

WL: Have u ever seen Solja Boy’s diamond Lamborghini necklace if so how much do you love it?

PG: Yes and a lot.  This is the kind of thing, the most ridiculous over the top piece that I usually parody with my designer guns.  It’s almost better when its not a parody and someone just rocks it sans irony.  Did you ever see ghostface killah’s eagle bracelet?  Amazing.

goshtfacensojaboy

WL: How did you become a full time working artist? And did art school really have anything to do with it?

PG: I became a full time artist gradually after school.  I started an auto painting business first, then gradually tapered that off as my art career got bigger.  I don’t know if art school really had anything to do with it.  I don’t think art school really taught me very much,it was more like just buying time to work on art.

LA_Art_Show_9-03_083

WL: By the way I really like your Disney font. Would you mind talking a little about it?

PG: Yeah I love that too… turns out its just a photoshop font called Waltography I think…  so I guess I can’t take credit for it.

petergronquist

WL: Last but not least what three fictional characters form any place and or time would you chose to be your bodyguards?

PG: Chewbacca, Mickey Morelli the escaped convict from pee wee’s big adventure, Unicron the planet eating robot planet (also easiest unicorn anagram ever).

body-gaurds

Sebastian Wahl: Kaleidoscope Eyes Video

Interview: Sebastian Wahl

Sebastian Wahl’s gearing up for his exhibition Kaleidoscope Eyes opening this Saturday February 5th, 2011 from 6-10pm. We got to interview him about his work and inspirations. Enjoy.

Gallery Hijinks: As a teenager you took a graffiti trip to New York from your hometown in Sweden and then decided that The Big Apple was your home. What was the draw to NY?

Sebastian Wahl: I was 16 years old and all that I cared about at that time was graffiti, so initially it was graffiti that drew me to NYC. Once there I realized how amazing the urban maze is. What I saw and experienced there in 7 days was just the tip of an iceberg, I wanted more.

Sebastian Wahl

GH: In your biography, you say that it was at your father’s advertising agency that acquainted you with collage and the exacto knife. Please explain how your upbringing has impacted your work today.

SW: I would say that my upbringing impacted my work in a very positive way. I think both of my parents realized that I was a dreamer and encouraged me to try to harness this in some kind of creative way.

GH: To me, this new collection of resin collage is a bit of departure from your previous works because they are design based and seem to have a Pop Art element to them. What was the inspiration to creating these works?

SW: You are right. This series has more of a pop art feel to it than my past work. My goal was to play with the negative space and try to keep everything very clean. There are still a lot of images in each piece but leaving the background white and using repeated imagery gives this body of work more of a pop feel which I think makes it easier to digest and more accessible to the viewer.

Spirit Bird by Sebastian Wahl

The inspiration for the kaleidoscope series came from being a fan of kaleidoscopes. As you know I love making Mandalas and these collages felt like a natural route for me to take. Plus, I love repetition and I rarely play around with it, so this was my chance.

GH: What does Kaleidoscope Eyes mean to you?

SW: It’s a line from the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds. Kaleidoscope eyes to me is a reference to hallucinating. As for using it as the title for the show, I have to give credit to my wife-she suggested using it.

GH: Your work always seems to have a psychedelic element to it. Have you ever been inspired by drugs you’ve taken, or am I jumping to conclusions?

SW: Psychedelics have absolutely been a source of inspiration for me. I will give you an example, the first time I ever did LSD I ended up at a friends house and she had a poster on the wall. It was a big mandala that I spent a large part of that evening melting in and out. The following day I decided to go back to my friends place and trace her poster. The tracing I did of that mandala became the outline that I used for my first mandala collage. It was also the second large-scale collage that I had made at that point. That experience alone and what came out of it is a big part of why I still do what I do today.

Mandala 4 by Sebastian Wahl

GH: What is your process in making the resin collages and how long does it take? Do you use multiple prints of the same image? Give us the lowdown.

SW: My process has naturally evolved and changed over the years. In the beginning, I tried to stay clear of the copy machine and only use images cut directly out of magazines. Eventually I realized that magazine print fades much faster than a color copy does, so the canon color copy machine and I became friends. At this stage I would keep my collection of images in categorized boxes. I worked like this for many years until a couple of years ago when I stared to scan my images and build a library in my computer I have since started the endless process of cutting them out in the computer using a Wacom Tablet. The decision to do this came when I started to use the resin in my process. Since I now layer the images in between layers of clear resin, it made sense to initiate the collage in Photo Shop. In Photoshop, I layer the images too.. so in this way I now know between what layers of resin each image is going to land. I use Photo Shop to create the original collage. Then I print out each individual image, cut it out by hand, glue it down, paint it with clear medium to protect it, and then pour resin over it. The resin hardens over night so I can get back to work on the following layer the next day. Depending of the size and intricacy of the piece it can take anywhere from a month to four months to complete one collage.

GH: Where or how do you acquire your images? Do you collect images and then fit them together, or do you start with the idea and then search for those specific pieces to fit the puzzle?

SW: I look for images everywhere constantly. This is one of the most important parts of what I do. I can’t go out and buy paint so I have to always be on a search for new material to keep things fresh. Since I now scan everything I will source images from books magazines or just about anywhere I find them.

I usually start with an idea in the form of an outline of sorts and then I look for images to fill those spaces. An image might find its place in one of my collages because of color or shape or a number of other reasons.

GH: What’s your favorite band or artist to listen to while you work?

SW: I love to listen to music when I work. I usually like to listen to playlists that are really long this way I don’t have to stop what I am doing to figure out what to play next. Sometimes it’s a mix of different artists and sometimes I pick one artist and listen to every album that band or artist ever did. But my taste in music is all over the place. I LOVE Jimi Hendrix, Bob Marley, and Bob Dylan. But I also listen to a lot of electronicia. I am a huge fan of Bassnectar.

Jimi Hendrix

GH: Lastly, who are some of your favorite artists and why?

SW: Let me give you a shorted version, otherwise we would be here all day.

Of the artists that are alive today I would say Alex Grey’s work is inspirational for a number of reasons. I think that he is amazing at capturing your imagination. I love his attention to detail and the subjects that he chooses to depict are usually packed with symbolism and spirit, all of which I love.

Another living artist that blows my mind is Fred Tomaselli. Tomaselli inspires me on many levels. We share a love for the same medium. It was after seeing a show by him at the James Cohan Gallery in NYC, 2006 that I was inspired to use resin in my process. Beside the fact that his work is transcendental and beautiful, he is also very successful. That gives me hope as a fellow collage artist, I look up to him.

Fred Tomaselli

I also love the work of Matthew Barney. In the midst of all that Vaseline, he still manages to be so incredibly prolific. His body of work is beyond my comprehension. Everything he does seems so weird yet so beautiful. He turns my imagination up to eleven.

Of all the great dead artists out there, two come to mind right away. Salvador Dali and Mati Klarwein. Dali painted the most visionary and beautiful surrealist paintings that anyone has ever seen. His paintings leave you with a feeling of amazement, and on top of that the man himself was art. He could have been a character in one of Matthew Barney’s movies. I am forever grateful for the never-ending fountain of inspiration he left us all.

Temptation by Salvador Dali

Mati Klarwein. If I were a painter, I would paint in the style of Mati. To me his paintings are like collages. This is not the only reason why I am drawn to his work. Much like Alex Grey, he has a way of transporting me. His attention to detail never fails to amaze me. His subject matter is mystical and shamanic. It holds all the qualities of a true visionary.

blessing-1965 by Mati Klarwein

Gallery Hijinks Interview with Sebastian Wahl
GH:
As a teenager you took a graffiti trip to New York from your hometown in Sweden and then decided that The Big Apple was your home. What was the draw to NY?
SW:
I was 16 years old and all that I cared about at that time was graffiti, so initially it was graffiti that drew me to NYC. Once there I realized how amazing the urban maze is. What I saw and experienced there in 7 days was just the tip of an iceberg, I wanted more.
GH:
How would you describe the art scene in Sweden today?
SW:
I am embarrassed to say but my experience with the Stockholm art scene is very limited. I go back home once a year tops, and when I am there it’s all about friends and family. Is that lame of me? Sorry Sweden! I love you! I just like the art scene in San Fran better.
GH:
In your biography, you say that it was at your father’s advertising agency that acquainted you with collage and the exacto knife.  Please explain how your upbringing has impacted your work today.
SW:
I would say that my upbringing impacted my work in a very positive way. I think both of my parents realized that I was a dreamer and encouraged me to
try to harness this in some kind of creative way.
GH:
To me, this new collection of resin collage is a bit of departure from your previous works because they are design based and seem to have a Pop Art element to them. What was the inspiration to creating these works?
SW:
You are right. This series has more of a pop art feel to it than my past work. My goal was to play with the negative space and try to keep everything very clean. There are still a lot of images in each piece but leaving the background white and using repeated imagery gives this body of work more of a pop feel which I think makes it easier to digest and more accessible to the viewer.
The inspiration for the kaleidoscope series came from being a fan of kaleidoscopes. As you know I love making Mandalas and these collages felt like a natural route for me to take. Plus, I love repetition and I rarely play around with it. so this was my chance.
GH:
What does Kaleidoscope Eyes mean to you?
SW:
It’s a line from the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.
Kaleidoscope eyes to me is a reference to hallucinating. As for using it as the title for the show, I have to give credit to my wife-she suggested using it.
GH:
Your work always seems to have a psychedelic element to it. Have you ever been inspired by drugs you’ve taken, or am I jumping to conclusions?
SW:
Psychedelics have absolutely been a source of inspiration for me. I will give you an example, the first time I ever did LSD I ended up at a friends house and she had a poster on the wall. It was a big mandala that I spent a large part of that evening melting in and out. The following day I decided to go back to my friends place and trace her poster. The tracing I did of that mandala became the outline that I used for my first mandala collage. It was also the second large-scale collage that I had made at that point. That experience alone and what came out of it is a big part of why I still do what I do today.
GH:
What is your process in making the resin collages and how long does it take? Do you use multiple prints of the same image?  Give us the lowdown.
SW:
My process has naturally evolved and changed over the years.
In the beginning, I tried to stay clear of the copy machine and only use images cut directly out of magazines. Eventually I realized that magazine print fades much faster than a color copy does, so the canon color copy machine and I became friends. At this stage I would keep my collection of images in categorized boxes. I worked like this for many years until a couple of years ago when I stared to scan my images and build a library in my computer I have since started the endless process of cutting them out in the computer using a Wacom Tablet. The decision to do this came when I started to use the resin in my process. Since I now layer the images in between layers of clear resin, it made sense to initiate the collage in Photo Shop. In Photoshop, I layer the images too.. so in this way I now know between what layers of resin each image is going to land. I use Photo Shop to create the original collage. Then I print out each individual image, cut it out by hand, glue it down, paint it with clear medium to protect it, and then pour resin over it. The resin hardens over night so I can get back to work on the following layer the next day. Depending of the size and intricacy of the piece it can take anywhere from a month to four months to complete one collage.
GH:
Where or how do you acquire your images? Do you collect images and then fit them together, or do you start with the idea and then search for those specific pieces to fit the puzzle?
SW:
I look for images everywhere constantly. This is one of the most important parts of what I do. I can’t go out and buy paint so I have to always be on a search for new material to keep things fresh.  Since I now scan everything I will source images from books magazines or just about anywhere I find them.
I usually start with an idea in the form of an outline of sorts and then I look for images to fill those spaces. An image might find its place in one of my collages because of color or shape or a number of other reasons.
GH:
What’s your favorite band or artist to listen to while you work?
SW:
I love to listen to music when I work. I usually like to listen to playlists that are really long this way I don’t have to stop what I am doing to figure out what to play next. Sometimes it’s a mix of different artists and sometimes I pick one artist and listen to every album that band or artist ever did. But my taste in music is all over the place. I LOVE Jimi Hendrix, Bob Marley, and Bob Dylan. But I also listen to a lot of electronicia. I am a huge fan of Bassnectar.
GH:
Lastly, who are some of your favorite artists and why?
SW:
Let me give you a shorted version, otherwise we would be here all day.
Of the artists that are alive today I would say Alex Grey’s work is inspirational for a number of reasons. I think that he is amazing at capturing your imagination. I love his attention to detail and the subjects that he chooses to depict are usually packed with symbolism and spirit, all of which I love. Another living artist that blows my mind is Fred Tomaselli. Tomaselli inspires me on many levels. We share a love for the same medium. It was after seeing a show by him at the James Cohan Gallery in NYC, 2006 that I was inspired to use resin in my process. Beside the fact that his work is transcendental and beautiful, he is also very successful. That gives me hope as a fellow collage artist, I look up to him. I also love the work of Mathew Barney. In the midst of all that Vaseline, he still manages to be so incredibly prolific. His body of work is beyond my comprehension. Everything he does seems so weird yet so beautiful. He turns my imagination up to eleven.
Of all the great dead artists out there, two come to mind right away. Salvador Dali and Mati Klarwein. Dali painted the most visionary and beautiful surrealist paintings that anyone has ever seen. His paintings leave you with a feeling of amazement, and on top of that the man himself was art. He could have been a character in one of Matthew Barney’s movies. I am forever grateful for the never-ending fountain of inspiration he left us all. Mati Klarwein. If I were a painter, I would paint in the style of Mati. To me his paintings are like collages. This is not the only reason why I am drawn to his work. Much like Alex Grey, he has a way of transporting me. His attention to detail never fails to amaze me. His subject matter is mystical and shamanic. It holds all the qualities of a true visionary.
Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
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