Tag: installation

The Love Story Machine by Allyson Seal

We had a great amount of participants for Allyson Seal’s Love Story Machine at the opening for Visions of Yore.  Seal’s installation is available for weddings, events, bachelorette parties, company events, etc. This includes a $700/3 hr rental for set up, transportation within the Bay Area, staffing and your own personal archive of guests’ stories to keep. It will be available for sign up and rental during the auction this coming Saturday.

 

 

 

(Photos courtesy of  Brad Bernhardt and David Young Kim)

If you haven’t had a chance to see her work, read on for her artist statement about the installation:

“We like telling stories—girl meets girl; girl loses girl; girl wins girl back. Or girl learns that heartbreak, like love, changes everything. We revel in the disturbance inherent to a good story, in the disequilibrium between two people, between many people. This unbalance brings drama, promises myriad moments of crisis where one thing becomes another.

 Love Story Machine endeavors to explore relationships between people, memory and language, to work intuitively with our instincts to organize the universe, and to embrace the great abstraction that unifies us all—love. This installation began as a collaboration between Allyson Seal, Bailey Smith & Elspeth Stowell. And, of course,  the larger community.

 The project asks participants to create a card for the catalogue that explicates a personal love story in a brief but evocative manner. The format of the card mimics the style of card found in the outmoded card catalogue. Once the story is written and titled, each participant is asked to categorize his or her narrative using the dewey decimal system. The goal is to amass a substantial collection of vignettes that map out our collective humanness.

We believe that we can accomplish more together than we can alone. Community and collaboration are ecstatic occasions. Both provide organic structure, boundaries composed by all players. Art and community create a place of incandescence even as it is heartbreaking, alienating, a vast landscape without a map.”

Margo Duvall

We’ve had a lot of beautiful installations in the gallery windows and I’m excited to put more amazing work by Margo Duvall in them. Margo has been perfecting and perfecting her photo transfers on different mediums and I’m thrilled to showcase her work which uses lights and the fantastic sunlight that comes into Hijink’s windows.

Margo investigates the role of photography as a means of documentation for moments that have passed, on both personal and historical levels. Photographs, however, also provide us with a false sense of security. Time moves on, photographs fade, people die, and memory deteriorates. Duvall’s delicate installation both reference the fragile and time sensitive elements of memory and photography’s role in this process.

Margo Duvall: We take pictures because we want to remember. We want to remember what someone looked like, our first day of school, our parents, and other significant moments, people, and events in our lives. We want to preserve the moments we fear will inevitably grow dim. We want to be remembered after we die, and photography serves us as a form of immortality.

Photographs provide us with proof that something once happened. They serve as documents for moments that have passed, on both personal and historical levels. But they also provide us with a false sense of security. Time moves on, photographs fade, people die, and memory deteriorates.

My interest in the role photography plays in our memory came about in a box at an antique store. There, I pieced together moments of a man’s life from his childhood through his elder years. Snapshots have become the residue, the evidence of our experiences. How does something so valuable, so representative of a person’s life, wind up as a commodity for sale in an antique store?

This work is an attempt to sustain the fleeting moments of families and lives. My desire to preserve photographs as memory in an unchanging state is symbolized by the selection of the materials used to encase them. The transparent medium simultaneously protects the image and retains a sense of memory within itself- acting as a skin containing and encompassing traces of where it has been. It holds information, immersed beneath the surface, which can be seen upon inspection. This acts much like our memories, in that the clues are there, but they are not always recognizable or understandable.

The images in this show are fragments in time. They become layered, obscured, and complicated by association with other moments. The invitation is open for the viewer to encounter these memories, discern the histories, create their own narratives, and be inspired to stimulate their own memory.

Pictures from Instill by Yellena James

If you haven’t come by yet to check out Yellena’s show…you’re really missing out. Here are some teasers of the installation and opening night to give you some incentive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos from the opening night of Too Far Gone

Meryl Pataky in LeBasse Projects

Meryl is a San Francisco based artist who works a wide range of mediums including precious metals, steel, paper, neon and found objects. She has an exhibition opening tonight, April 28th and runs through May 19th at LeBasse Projects in LA.  Her show, entitled Future Sailor, is a commentary on universal connection – creating a discussion of beginnings and endings by introducing cyclical imagery and concepts of existence. Pataky blends psychological and biological themes to bring attention to a universal order and its unbreakable pattern. This order and connection is applied to the basic pattern of life and death and expands to include subjective ideas of emotion, relationships, language and experience.

Take a look at some previews of her show:

Visions of Yore-A Juried Exhibition in Gallery Hijinks

TO SUBMIT WORK HEAD OVER TO  http://www.galleryhijinks.com/about/juried-exhibition

Gallery Hijinks is proud to announce its first juried exhibition, Visions of Yore. Along with the gallery director, Tanya Gayer, Gallery Hijinks has invited guest juror Emily Lakin of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts to be a part of the selection process. The exhibition will occur July 7th, 2012, and include live performance and artists lectures during the month, as well as an auction at the close of the exhibition.

Submissions are open to a range of work including sculpture, painting, printmaking, sound, video, installation, and mixed media work. The exhibiting artists should demonstrate the  quality of their work and relevance to the exhibition concept. The exhibition is open to all artists aged 18 and over. Artists must be willing to take on personal responsibility for their artwork if unsold after the exhibition closes. Entries should be completed within 2 years prior to the deadline. The exhibit is open to the public.

Visions of Yore

Katharine Harmon, the author of The Map as Art, notes that to ‘orientate’ is to, “hop back and forth between landscape and time, geography and emotion, knowledge and behavior. Associations often happen with this idea of orienting because of memory springing from these categories.” To translate memory is to recall the sensory and time sensitive elements of a memory.

Memories coexist with time and space neither in the present or past, nor in one location at one time, but in fact exist and apply aspects from different places and people at all times. The process of remembering takes place in such an instant that memories only have concrete form by way of specific documentation.

Gallery Hijinks seeks works that  come from our beliefs of memory. At times memory cannot be pinned down, but only felt as a means of consciousness vying for a state of attention. Cues encountered in everyday life evoke past recollections without effort, while sometimes we deliberately try to piece together the past. Artists are encouraged to submit work in homage to memory and how it is recognized in regards to the visual and formulated.

Exhibition Details:
Deadline for submissions: June 1st, 2012
Submission Fee: $20
Artists accepted for the exhibition will be notified by June 4th. Works must be delivered to Gallery Hijinks no later than June 27th, 2012.

Works will be on sale for the duration of the exhibition both in the gallery and online. The artist will receive 50 percent of the set retail price if the work sells during the month of July. If the works do not sell by July 27th, then it will be included in a larger auction held on July 28th. Artists will receive 40 percent of the original retail price no matter the auction’s final selling price. The starting bid will be set at 50 percent of the retail price unless requested otherwise (please include in Additional Details of Work section below). The starting bid and a reserve price will be reflected in the contract signed after selection process.

 

TO SUBMIT WORK HEAD OVER TO  http://www.galleryhijinks.com/about/juried-exhibition

 

Coming Up!

New Works by Randy Colosky

On Exhibit: April 7th-April 28th, 2012

Opening Reception: April 7th, 2012 from 6-10pm

New Works by Randy Colosky opens in Gallery Hijinks this April 2012. In addition to Colosky’s solo exhibtion, the backroom of the gallery will feature Colosky’s own selection of other artists’ works. His solo exhibition features a continuation in his exploration in his “Nondeterministic Algorithm” series of seven featured ink drawings on paper. These drawings are made by drawing ellipses and rectangles repeatedly to create a free-formed vortex of architectural design, texture, and space. The opening reception will take place on April 7th, 2012 from 6pm-10pm.

In Randy Colosky’s practice he often takes an object or materials that would typically have a utilitarian purpose and alters its function to generate a new aesthetic language or optical information. For New Works, Colosky’s pen and ink drawings are made with pattern templates that are modeled after architectural templates used in drafting. The template sets up a set of rules in the drawing, however he chooses the specific direction of each iteration of the template. This allows him to actively participate in the drawing process yet he never fully comprehend what the drawing will ultimately look like. These drawings are a symbolic of Colosky’s manner of meditation in that the more he trains his mind to become aware of each moment he experiences and the changes between them, the more he finds that he is able to realize an existence that is more present in the moment and simpler to navigate.

Although trained in traditional ceramics and building construction, Colosky’s interest in process, function, and subtle wit are what drives the scope of his mediums to vary from drawing, sculpture, design, collage, and installation. For New Works his exploration in traditional means of pen and ink work is a unique direction in connection to his past works of atypical material. Yet, his process of altering the conventional usage of architectural templates allow this work to remain in the same vein of his past work and interest in challenging established visual language.

Previously based in San Francisco, Colosky now lives and works in Oakland. He received his BFA in ceramics from Kansas City Art Institute and has recently exhibited in the Museum of Craft and Folk Art. In the last few years he’s exhibited at Chandra Cerrito Contemporary, Incline Gallery, Adobe Books Back Room, ATA Left Window Gallery, Gallery Extrana, Ampersand International Arts, Southern Exposure, The Lab, Kavi Gupta Gallery, Hallway Bathroom Gallery, Low Gallery, Hosfelt Gallery, Savage Art Resources, White Box Gallery, and Alston Skirt Gallery, and previous publications in The Universe, the SF Chronicle, No New Enemies, and My Love For You. 
The backroom artists which Colosky has selected are as follows:
Kristina Lewis
Helen Lee
Andy Vogt
Alison O.K. Frost
Jesse Houlding
Ajit Chauhan
Clare Sydalowski
Amanda Hughen
Phil Mcgaughy

New Works by Randy Colosky is on exhibit April 7th through April 28th, 2012 at Gallery Hijinks located at 2309 Bryant Street, San Francisco CA 94110. For more information on Randy Colosky please contact visit our media kit or email us at info@galleryhijinks.com.


Matthew Craven Talks About His Installation for FRGMNTS

Matthew arrived this week and is working on an installation piece to go along with his works for FRGMNTS, opening this Saturday. We recorded him yesterday talking about his installation. Take a look at the pictures below and then click the link at the bottom to hear the recording:

 

 

Click here to listen to Matthew talk about this installation

FRGMNTS will be opening this Saturday, February 4th from 6-10pm.


Interview: Scott Greenwalt

As I try to wrap my head around the works of Scott Greenwalt I continuously find myself spiraling into a mind trip of gore, patterns and the grotesque beauty of these large scale portraits and lanscapes. In an effort to understand the artist intentions and purpose behind the works, we sat down to interview Scott and pick his brain on inspiration, process, history and the psychology of his new collection of works, Alchemist.

Gallery Hijinks: What inspired and motivated your new body of work?

Scott Greenwalt: The last 37 years of life on planet Earth.

Following-Our-Discussion-Last-Winter

GH: Controlled chaos seems to play a role in your paintings, where compositions flow into strange and unexpected directions. Please explain the artistic process.

SG: For quite some time I have been obsessed with depicting action in new ways. A major component of the germination of my ideas is simply time. I usually spend about six months on any one painting from start to finish. I work on several paintings at a time and spend a lot of time just sitting with them, individually as well as grouped together, looking into them to find what they need next. It’s a slow building of incremental growth and change. If everything is comprised of infinitesimal parts in constant motion, how does everything keep from intermingling? My work concerns an alternate dimension where plants, minerals, animals, electrical charges, ectoplasmic effluvium, atmospheric conditions all come together momentarily and form a new being, then move apart into reformed organisms. This process continues infinitely, without ever stabilizing.

Spectral Unfolding by Scott Greenwalt

GH: Do you have an initial idea for the piece, do you sketch or does it just flow from you in an organic way?

SG: I usually have a really vague idea at the outset what the overall form and color scheme will be. Once I actually start painting, the various components build off of one another and later weave back through each other. The paintings are generally grounded in traditional formats of landscape and portraiture. That sets up a loose structure to experiment within. Then I just make shit up as I go along.

GH: Please explain the philosophy behind the portraits? What are some of the inspirations and why?

SG: One of the initial inspirations for the large portraits were the large black and white paintings by Chuck Close. I had been fascinated with them since first seeing “Keith” as a kid at the St. Louis Art Museum. One day, about a year ago, I stood before some of his large works from the last several decades, but I could not take my eyes off one particular portrait. What captivated me was the handling of the subject’s chapped and weathered lips. The more I looked, the more broken down and abstract it appeared, comprised of jagged little triangle forms. This was before his spinal artery collapse and resulting change of approach, but there were the same things going on in those lips that manifested on a looser, more abstract level in his later work. Since I don’t work directly from reference material most of the time, I am faced with the challenge of abstracting something that didn’t exist yet. Rather than breaking down an existing image into abstract units, I am trying to herd disparate abstract units into an understandable, yet alien image.

"Keith" by Chuck Close

"Keith" by Chuck Close

Francis Bacon’s work has been the richest source of inspiration and frustration. How does one go about deconstructing the nature of the human animal, modern life on earth and the history of painting in the wake of such masterful handling of the subject? This problem can keep me up at night. I also spend countless hours ruminating on the work of Hieronymus Bosch.

"Self Portrait" by Francis Bacon

"Self Portrait" by Francis Bacon

"Portrait of Michel Leris" by Francis Bacon

"Portrait of Michel Leris" by Francis Bacon

Detail of "Christ in Limbo" by Hieronymus Bosch

Detail of "Christ in Limbo" by Hieronymus Bosch

Then there is my obsession with the work of special make-up effects artists Rick Baker and Rob Bottin. Growing up watching sci-fi and horror films, mostly from the 80s, was a tremendous influence on everything that I have done artistically. Bottin’s work on John Carpenter’s The Thing may have been the single biggest influence on the way I look at the world.

MIB special effects by Rick Baker

MIB special effects by Rick Baker

GH: How do the paper pieces with wood glue fit into the equation?

SG: I’m interested in what happens to an iconic image after the icon becomes obscured. What happens to the human face when layers build up and obscure the features beyond recognition? If the human head suffers a massive physical trauma, the swelling that results can distort and obscure the signature forms of a once recognizable face. In time, the swelling reduces, the wounds heal and the body returns to it’s normal state. Though a significant transformation has occurred, often scar tissue will be the only visible artifact of this change. With this work, I am concerned with the manufactured transformation that transpires when semi-translucent layers are built up, slowly swallowing up any distinguishing characteristics into an ectoplasmic goo, leaving the remaining robes to swaddle the amorphous slime.

Vaporous Mold Spore with Pearl Earring (after Vermeer)

Vaporous Mold Spore with Pearl Earring (after Vermeer)

GH: The dark, rich, color palate (i.e. red drapes, black backgrounds, earth tones) versus the bright, even neon colors both play an equal part in this collection. Please explain your reasons for using these very different hues and how you’ve made them work together?

SG: For the last few years I had started all of my paintings on a black background to eliminate context. They were like organisms floating within a void. Over time, this void became more densely populated and space began to form. In outer space, each chemical gas reflects a distinct color. As these organisms become more complex in ever expanding space, more chemical reactions take place, generating stranger wavelengths of light.

Seventeen Minutes Prior to This Exact Moment by Scott Greenwalt

Seventeen Minutes Prior to This Exact Moment by Scott Greenwalt

GH: How is art history incorporated into the body of work?

SG: I think about the history of painting, it’s evolution through the centuries, and it’s contemporary potential as a relevant means of expression on a daily basis. I guess, like any revision of history, my vantage is skewed toward my own idiosyncratic aesthetic preferences. I borrow what is useful or interesting to me and generally ignore the rest.

GH: What are five words that would describe your art?

SG: that shit is fucked up.

Sebastian Wahl’s Moog Collage Mural

Sebastian Wahl never ceases to amaze me. Check out this extra large collage mural he made for Moog Fest 2011.

Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
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