Tag: opening reception

Pictures from Instill by Yellena James

If you haven’t come by yet to check out Yellena’s show…you’re really missing out. Here are some teasers of the installation and opening night to give you some incentive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coming Up!

New Works by Randy Colosky

On Exhibit: April 7th-April 28th, 2012

Opening Reception: April 7th, 2012 from 6-10pm

New Works by Randy Colosky opens in Gallery Hijinks this April 2012. In addition to Colosky’s solo exhibtion, the backroom of the gallery will feature Colosky’s own selection of other artists’ works. His solo exhibition features a continuation in his exploration in his “Nondeterministic Algorithm” series of seven featured ink drawings on paper. These drawings are made by drawing ellipses and rectangles repeatedly to create a free-formed vortex of architectural design, texture, and space. The opening reception will take place on April 7th, 2012 from 6pm-10pm.

In Randy Colosky’s practice he often takes an object or materials that would typically have a utilitarian purpose and alters its function to generate a new aesthetic language or optical information. For New Works, Colosky’s pen and ink drawings are made with pattern templates that are modeled after architectural templates used in drafting. The template sets up a set of rules in the drawing, however he chooses the specific direction of each iteration of the template. This allows him to actively participate in the drawing process yet he never fully comprehend what the drawing will ultimately look like. These drawings are a symbolic of Colosky’s manner of meditation in that the more he trains his mind to become aware of each moment he experiences and the changes between them, the more he finds that he is able to realize an existence that is more present in the moment and simpler to navigate.

Although trained in traditional ceramics and building construction, Colosky’s interest in process, function, and subtle wit are what drives the scope of his mediums to vary from drawing, sculpture, design, collage, and installation. For New Works his exploration in traditional means of pen and ink work is a unique direction in connection to his past works of atypical material. Yet, his process of altering the conventional usage of architectural templates allow this work to remain in the same vein of his past work and interest in challenging established visual language.

Previously based in San Francisco, Colosky now lives and works in Oakland. He received his BFA in ceramics from Kansas City Art Institute and has recently exhibited in the Museum of Craft and Folk Art. In the last few years he’s exhibited at Chandra Cerrito Contemporary, Incline Gallery, Adobe Books Back Room, ATA Left Window Gallery, Gallery Extrana, Ampersand International Arts, Southern Exposure, The Lab, Kavi Gupta Gallery, Hallway Bathroom Gallery, Low Gallery, Hosfelt Gallery, Savage Art Resources, White Box Gallery, and Alston Skirt Gallery, and previous publications in The Universe, the SF Chronicle, No New Enemies, and My Love For You. 
The backroom artists which Colosky has selected are as follows:
Kristina Lewis
Helen Lee
Andy Vogt
Alison O.K. Frost
Jesse Houlding
Ajit Chauhan
Clare Sydalowski
Amanda Hughen
Phil Mcgaughy

New Works by Randy Colosky is on exhibit April 7th through April 28th, 2012 at Gallery Hijinks located at 2309 Bryant Street, San Francisco CA 94110. For more information on Randy Colosky please contact visit our media kit or email us at info@galleryhijinks.com.


Interview: Scott Greenwalt

As I try to wrap my head around the works of Scott Greenwalt I continuously find myself spiraling into a mind trip of gore, patterns and the grotesque beauty of these large scale portraits and lanscapes. In an effort to understand the artist intentions and purpose behind the works, we sat down to interview Scott and pick his brain on inspiration, process, history and the psychology of his new collection of works, Alchemist.

Gallery Hijinks: What inspired and motivated your new body of work?

Scott Greenwalt: The last 37 years of life on planet Earth.

Following-Our-Discussion-Last-Winter

GH: Controlled chaos seems to play a role in your paintings, where compositions flow into strange and unexpected directions. Please explain the artistic process.

SG: For quite some time I have been obsessed with depicting action in new ways. A major component of the germination of my ideas is simply time. I usually spend about six months on any one painting from start to finish. I work on several paintings at a time and spend a lot of time just sitting with them, individually as well as grouped together, looking into them to find what they need next. It’s a slow building of incremental growth and change. If everything is comprised of infinitesimal parts in constant motion, how does everything keep from intermingling? My work concerns an alternate dimension where plants, minerals, animals, electrical charges, ectoplasmic effluvium, atmospheric conditions all come together momentarily and form a new being, then move apart into reformed organisms. This process continues infinitely, without ever stabilizing.

Spectral Unfolding by Scott Greenwalt

GH: Do you have an initial idea for the piece, do you sketch or does it just flow from you in an organic way?

SG: I usually have a really vague idea at the outset what the overall form and color scheme will be. Once I actually start painting, the various components build off of one another and later weave back through each other. The paintings are generally grounded in traditional formats of landscape and portraiture. That sets up a loose structure to experiment within. Then I just make shit up as I go along.

GH: Please explain the philosophy behind the portraits? What are some of the inspirations and why?

SG: One of the initial inspirations for the large portraits were the large black and white paintings by Chuck Close. I had been fascinated with them since first seeing “Keith” as a kid at the St. Louis Art Museum. One day, about a year ago, I stood before some of his large works from the last several decades, but I could not take my eyes off one particular portrait. What captivated me was the handling of the subject’s chapped and weathered lips. The more I looked, the more broken down and abstract it appeared, comprised of jagged little triangle forms. This was before his spinal artery collapse and resulting change of approach, but there were the same things going on in those lips that manifested on a looser, more abstract level in his later work. Since I don’t work directly from reference material most of the time, I am faced with the challenge of abstracting something that didn’t exist yet. Rather than breaking down an existing image into abstract units, I am trying to herd disparate abstract units into an understandable, yet alien image.

"Keith" by Chuck Close

"Keith" by Chuck Close

Francis Bacon’s work has been the richest source of inspiration and frustration. How does one go about deconstructing the nature of the human animal, modern life on earth and the history of painting in the wake of such masterful handling of the subject? This problem can keep me up at night. I also spend countless hours ruminating on the work of Hieronymus Bosch.

"Self Portrait" by Francis Bacon

"Self Portrait" by Francis Bacon

"Portrait of Michel Leris" by Francis Bacon

"Portrait of Michel Leris" by Francis Bacon

Detail of "Christ in Limbo" by Hieronymus Bosch

Detail of "Christ in Limbo" by Hieronymus Bosch

Then there is my obsession with the work of special make-up effects artists Rick Baker and Rob Bottin. Growing up watching sci-fi and horror films, mostly from the 80s, was a tremendous influence on everything that I have done artistically. Bottin’s work on John Carpenter’s The Thing may have been the single biggest influence on the way I look at the world.

MIB special effects by Rick Baker

MIB special effects by Rick Baker

GH: How do the paper pieces with wood glue fit into the equation?

SG: I’m interested in what happens to an iconic image after the icon becomes obscured. What happens to the human face when layers build up and obscure the features beyond recognition? If the human head suffers a massive physical trauma, the swelling that results can distort and obscure the signature forms of a once recognizable face. In time, the swelling reduces, the wounds heal and the body returns to it’s normal state. Though a significant transformation has occurred, often scar tissue will be the only visible artifact of this change. With this work, I am concerned with the manufactured transformation that transpires when semi-translucent layers are built up, slowly swallowing up any distinguishing characteristics into an ectoplasmic goo, leaving the remaining robes to swaddle the amorphous slime.

Vaporous Mold Spore with Pearl Earring (after Vermeer)

Vaporous Mold Spore with Pearl Earring (after Vermeer)

GH: The dark, rich, color palate (i.e. red drapes, black backgrounds, earth tones) versus the bright, even neon colors both play an equal part in this collection. Please explain your reasons for using these very different hues and how you’ve made them work together?

SG: For the last few years I had started all of my paintings on a black background to eliminate context. They were like organisms floating within a void. Over time, this void became more densely populated and space began to form. In outer space, each chemical gas reflects a distinct color. As these organisms become more complex in ever expanding space, more chemical reactions take place, generating stranger wavelengths of light.

Seventeen Minutes Prior to This Exact Moment by Scott Greenwalt

Seventeen Minutes Prior to This Exact Moment by Scott Greenwalt

GH: How is art history incorporated into the body of work?

SG: I think about the history of painting, it’s evolution through the centuries, and it’s contemporary potential as a relevant means of expression on a daily basis. I guess, like any revision of history, my vantage is skewed toward my own idiosyncratic aesthetic preferences. I borrow what is useful or interesting to me and generally ignore the rest.

GH: What are five words that would describe your art?

SG: that shit is fucked up.

“Alchemist” Reviews

Huge thanks to the awesome folks at Art Beat and Hi-Fructose for posting their reviews for Scott Greenwalt‘s opening of Alchemist. “Scott Greenwalt creates visually arresting work, a snapshot into the realm of chemical changes and processes as would be seen in a mad scientist’s microscope.” Thank you Hi-Fructose.

Lastly, thank you to Art Beat’s photos from the opening on Saturday.

"Alchemist" opening at Gallery Hijinks

"Alchemist" opening at Gallery Hijinks

Scott Greenwalt at the opening of "Alchemist"

Scott Greenwalt at the opening of "Alchemist"

Scott Greenwalt at the opening of his show

Scott Greenwalt at the opening of his show.

Video: Alchemist by Scott Greenwalt

Check out this studio visit with Scott Greenwalt as he prepares for his solo exhibition, Alchemist, at Gallery Hijinks opening November 12th, from 6-10pm and on display until December 17th, 2011.

Shot and edited by Jesse Chandler. Music by Scott Greenwalt.

Interview with Pakayla Biehn on Hi-Fructose

Hi-Fructose caught up with our girl Pakayla Biehn to pick her brain on her most recent collection of painting. Check out what Miss Biehn had to say about integrating technology into her artistic process, personal inspiration, childhood embarrassments and what to expect from her next!

Pakayla Biehn painting

Initially the double exposure effect was a direct image of what I experienced, but as I explored the theme more I began to discover a multitude of transcendental issues within the work. Most importantly the passage of time and thought, the eternal and durable, sustainability versus impermanence; these images very much serve as a metaphor for my relationships. Things that are usually, but don’t necessarily have to be, mutually exclusive.

These paintings are already visually confusing and I think that the only honest and clear way to paint them is photorealism. Coming from a mathematics background, I’m most familiar with having a final product known and plugging my variables in to create an equation that is coherent.” Read the entire post here.

Opening reception pictures of (t)here by Pakayla Biehn

The opening reception of (t)here by Pakayla Biehn was a night of beauty featuring eight double exposure paintings, a window installation of dangling plants and a fabulous video installation.  Thanks to all the friends and family who made it out to share in the celebration! Check out some pictures from the night’s events below.

Pakayla Biehn at Gallery Hijinks

high fives at Gallery Hijinks

Pakayla Biehn opening at Gallery Hijinks

video installation at Gallery Hijinks

(t)here by Pakayla Biehn

(t)here at Gallery Hijinks

(t)here opening reception at Gallery Hijinks

Opening reception of (t)here by Pakayla Biehn

Walter at Gallery Hijinks

succulent plants at Gallery Hijinks

window installation

smoking is bad for your health

Lisa Congdon and Clay at Gallery Hijinks

Gallery Hijinks Babes

(t)here installation at Gallery Hijinks

Babes in Gallery Hijinks

Gallery Hijinks

Photographs taken by Jesse Chandler

What’s new with Mark Warren Jacques

mark warren jacques art studio

A new studio and the beginnings of some big paintings, our pal Mark Warren Jacques gears up for his solo show at White Walls this December. Additionally he will be guest curating a group exhibition in March 2012 at Gallery Hijinks based on COLOR.

Alchemist new works by Scott Greenwalt

scott copy

On Exhibit: November 12th – December 17th, 2011

Opening Reception: November 12th, 2011 from 6-10pm

Gallery Hijinks is proud to present Alchemist, an exhibition of paintings and manipulated portraiture by Oakland based artist, Scott Greenwalt. This most recent collection of works showcases figurative and literal exploration of the unseen moments of transmutation. Please join us for the opening reception on November 12th, 2011, from 6-10pm.

Alchemist depicts the abstracted nature of change, a metamorphosis, seemingly slowed down, broken apart, and frozen in the exact moment before everything unifies to resemble something familiar. Greenwalt’s grotesque paintings draw upon theories similar to the medieval sciences of alchemy, which attempt to realize the concepts of constant transformation, decay, and mutation of all elements that encompass life.

Grounded in traditional formats of landscape and portraiture, the artist creates large-scale acrylic paintings on canvas and wood panel. The dark rich color fields in which Greenwalt’s portraits exist serve to eliminate the context from which they manifested, as if floating within a void. Red drapery hangs from the unrecognizable forms, obscuring their unknown physical state. Vast landscapes are swarmed by alchemical and supernatural phenomenon. Coinciding with the paintings, the artist experiments with prints of iconic portraiture, using viscous semi-transparent adhesives to distort and disguise the human face beyond recognition.

Inspired by the great works of Francis Bacon, Hieronymus Bosch, and Chuck Close the artist professes “I am faced with the challenge of abstracting something that didn’t exist yet. Ratherthan breaking down the existing image into abstract units, I am trying to herd disparate abstract units into an understandable, yet alien image.” Growing up watching 1980’s sci-fi and horror films was an obvious influence on the artist’s overall aesthetic, citing the work done by special effects make-up artist Rob Bottin on John Carpenter’s ‘The Thing’ as the single greatest influence on Greenwalt’s perspective.

Missouri born Greenwalt has exhibited steadily since 1997, after completing his first degree from Central Missouri, then moving to California to acquire his Masters from CCA. He currently resides in Oakland, California.

Alchemist, by Scott Greenwalt opens November 12th and runs through December 17th, 2011. This event is open to the public.

“Sing You Back To Sleep” Video

Thanks to everyone who came out this past Saturday for the opening reception of (t)here by Pakayla Biehn. If you missed out we unveiled new double exposure paintings by Miss Biehn and premiered “Sing Me Back To Sleep” video installation. Check out the music video here called “Sing you back to sleep” by Sweet Tooth Nelson.

Directed By: Joe Lumbroso
Cinematography: Tylor Bohlman
Art Direction: Pakayla Biehn
Written By: Jillian Mackintosh
Editing/Visual Effects: Tylor Bohlman and Joe Lumbroso
Additional Editing: Jesse Chandler
Starring: Tessa Ribitsch

Song: “Sing you back to sleep” by Sweet Tooth Nelson.

Produced by: thirdstreetworks.com


Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
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