Tag: pretty girls

Interview with Pakayla Biehn on Hi-Fructose

Hi-Fructose caught up with our girl Pakayla Biehn to pick her brain on her most recent collection of painting. Check out what Miss Biehn had to say about integrating technology into her artistic process, personal inspiration, childhood embarrassments and what to expect from her next!

Pakayla Biehn painting

Initially the double exposure effect was a direct image of what I experienced, but as I explored the theme more I began to discover a multitude of transcendental issues within the work. Most importantly the passage of time and thought, the eternal and durable, sustainability versus impermanence; these images very much serve as a metaphor for my relationships. Things that are usually, but don’t necessarily have to be, mutually exclusive.

These paintings are already visually confusing and I think that the only honest and clear way to paint them is photorealism. Coming from a mathematics background, I’m most familiar with having a final product known and plugging my variables in to create an equation that is coherent.” Read the entire post here.

Sebastian Wahl’s SF trip and studio visit with Robert Hardgrave.

How time flies. It seems like yesterday that we were installing the kaleidoscope eyes in the front window for Sebastian Wahl‘s opening reception. If you haven’t got the chance to see the exhibition feel free to stop by the gallery before the closing on Saturday the 26th.

Here are some pictures of Sebastian’s visit to San Francisco as well as his studio visit with Robert Hardgrave.

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

Walter and Joe

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Pas Un Autre in Photography: Jason Levins

If you haven’t  read the infamous Fingerbanging Amelia Earheart zine by Jason Levins, you are most certainly missing out. Pas Un Autre an online journal of arts, culture, sex and inspiration recently wrote an analytical critique of Levins photography and questions “was there ever sanctity in art in the first place?”. Great article.

bens-trick-balls_jason_levins-777x521

Pas Un Autre in Photography: If there was anything in the world to denote the end of artistic sanctity, it would be the work of photographer Jason Levins. Using old point and shoot cameras and disposable film has been done a million times. In the bleary eyed dystopic fantasy Jason Levins captures through his lens there is a sense of irony that peers through, like light through cracks in a pitch black church. And in the columns of  light we  find illuminated our youth like rats scurrying in the putrid rot of some alternate zeitgeist: pulling their balls out under tables, drinking pabst blue ribbon, breasts, diy tattoos, camping.  But this raises a serious question: was there ever sanctity in art in the first place?  I have grappled for a little while now on how to fairly criticize Levins’ photography, because, not only are his photographs deserving of questions, they are also worthy of analytical review.  If we look close enough we can find small, dazzling gems of humanity peering back out through the cracks, in small private moments of a youth grappling with their identity in an age of war and catastrophe.  In this light, Jasons Levins works become a highly critical essay on the condition of youth in our post modern society. We must fuck all to get us through the strange and frightening condition of the world, but fuck all with love – and that just might be the moral of the story. www.staticonthebrain.com

And remember you can always find Fingerbanging Amelia Earheart zine by Jason Levins on our online store.

Opening Reception of As It Was Before

Thanks to all of our friends and family who came out last Saturday for the opening reception of As It Was Before new works by Martin Machado and Todd Freeman with installations by Aleksandra Zee. For those who couldn’t make it, here’s a little recap of the nights events.

Marty and Allie

Marty and Allie

Todd Freeman Copper and hand painted prints

Todd Freeman copper and hand painted prints

Martin Machado oil paintings and photographs

Martin Machado oil paintings and photographs

Installation shot of Aleksandra Zee's nests

Installation shot of Aleksandra Zee's nests

Nest in the corner, art on the walls.

girl

girls

Gallery Hijinks

Gallery Hijinks

Strangers in the night

Strangers in the night

Todd Freeman

Todd Freeman

Aleksandra Zee

Aleksandra Zee

The Scene

The Scene

Thanks to Asiento for providing an amazing after party!

Thanks to Asiento for providing an amazing after party!

For more pictures of the opening reception, visit our flickr page.

Interview & Studio Visit: Aleksandra Zee

Aleksandra Zee lives and works in San Francisco, California. Her many disciplines include installations, display design, sculpture, construction and painting. We were lucky enough to get a quick glance at her art studio and work shop. We asked her a few questions about her installation project titled “What happens when they meet?” which opens on January 8th, 2011 from 6-10pm at Gallery Hijinks.

allie j zee

Gallery Hijinks: What is your inspiration in creating your sculptural installations for “As it was before”?

Aleksandra Zee: Initially the installation was inspired by natural objects and unnatural objects being forced to work together to form one unit. Later in the creation process I was greatly inspired by a tiny bird’s nest that Jillian had found in her yard. Though it was very small, it was perfect. A perfect sphere, with every piece of twine and branch carefully and precisely woven together. It was incredible and has been at the forefront of my mind in creating this installation.

natures best

GH: Please explain your process. What materials and process do you use?

AZ: My process begins with a larger then life image in my mind. I then think of what material I would like to mass out in order to make these large images a reality. The materials that I chose to work with are, wood, paper and branches. I wove everything together keeping in mind the integrity of the material.

aleksandra zee

beginning stages of nest

GH: Your aesthetic is very organic and terraqueous. Why have you chosen to use elements of nature combined with those made by man?

AZ: I love the juxtaposition of that moment when the two (man made and natural) meet and work together. It is beautiful to me to see materials transform right before my eyes, even though I am the one manipulating them.

aleksandra zee booksinstallation

GH: Does your work often tell a story, if so what is this tale?

AZ: Yes I love for my work to have a quiet story that only suggests that there is more behind what is going on right in front of the viewer. The story that I am portraying with this installation is the moment that the natural and unnatural meet and become one unit.

GH: I hear your workspace is nothing less that a crafts man’s workshop. Which are your favorite and most used tools while creating your art?

AZ: My favorite tool ever is my jigsaw, I love it!!!!! I do have to say that I use hot glue on a daily basis, it works for everything.

allie zee work shop

aleksandra zee studio

aleksandra zee art studio

GH: Did you go to school to become a multidiscipline artist?

AZ: I actually went to school with the intention of becoming an art teacher and found myself falling in love with mixed media, sculpture and LARGE-scale installations. I love to build and construct!

aleksandra zee studio

GH: Who are some of your favorite artists today?

AZ: Peter Callesen makes incredible things out of cardboard and paper, he build a castle out of cardboard!

My favorite right now is an installation artist named Chiharu Shiota. Her installations using windows absolutely blows my mind. So beautiful!

New Prints: Handmade & Magi

Chris Blackstock just released two prints on our online store TODAY. These original prints are made in the traditional fashion of lithography and are an edition of 12 each (although there are only a few for sale). The prints are 11″ x 15″ on Reeves printing paper, titled and signed by the artist.

Handmade print by Chris Blackstock

Handmade print by Chris Blackstock

Magi print by Chris Blackstock

Magi print by Chris Blackstock

At first glance the print might seem similar to a graphite drawing but the process of creating a lithograph is much more complex. Lithography was invented by Alois Senefelder in Bohemia in 1796. In the early days of lithography, a smooth piece of limestone was used (hence the name “lithography”—”lithos” is the ancient Greek word for stone). After the oil-based image was put on the surface (usually applied using a wax litho crayon), a solution of gum arabic in water was applied, the gum sticking only to the non-oily surface. During printing, water adhered to the gum arabic surfaces and avoided the oily parts, while the oily ink used for printing did the opposite.

The printing process is arduous and can take a few hours just to make a few prints. All the printing is hand done and rolled through a press that applies 1200 pounds of pressure onto the limestone block. If there is any debris on the stone it can cause the stone to split in half.

Here are some detail shots exhibiting the complexity of Blackstock’s work. These prints are priced at $50 each, a steal. Feel free to come to the gallery to see them in person or order online here. Click on image to see high rez.

Handmade print detail

Handmade print detail

Handmade print detail

Handmade print detail

Handmade print detail

Handmade print detail

Magi print detail

Magi print detail

I never realized there was a second set of eyes until I took this detail shot.

Magi print detail

Magi print detail

Magi print detail

Magi print detail

Art Basel Miami & Pulse Art Fair

Here’s the last of it. Coverage of Art Basel and Pulse Art Fair, as if you haven’t seen enough from Miami 2011 in the past three weeks. I’d like to thank our amazing friend and artist Sebastian Wahl for contributing his wonderful pictures from Art Basel.

Basquiat

BasquiatBasquiat

Evan Penny

Evan Penny

Barry McGeeBarry McGee

Richard PrinceRichard Prince

IMG_1112Remed

Ray SellRay Sell

MondongoMondongo

Mondongo sticker detailMondongo sticker detail

Mars1Mars1

lorraine-shemesh-detailLorraine Shemesh

Lorraine Shemesh detailLorraine Shemesh detail

James RosenquistJames Rosenquist

Kehinde Wiley

IMG_0704

Ron English muralRon English mural

party

Last but not least, Pulse Art Fair (plus a few random good ones from here and there.)

Mark Wagner

Mark Wargner

Mark Wagner

Mark Wagner detail

Mark Wagner detailMark Wagner detail

Christopher DavisdonChristopher Davidson

Jung-Yeon Min

Jung-Yeon Min

Andy Diaz Hope tapestry Andy Diaz Hope tapestry

rad

Jan FabreJan Fabre

Kevin Cyr

Kevin Cyr

Erik Tho Sandberg

Erik Thor Sandberg

jorge mayetJorge Mayet

jorge mayetJorge Mayet

Gregory EuclideGregory Euclide

Highly Contagious Closing Party!!!

HighlyContagious_galleryhijinks_closing

Come see the featured works by Christopher Blackstock, Peter Gronquist, Robert Minervini, Sebastian Wahl, Langdon Graves, Andrea Wan, Catherine Ryan, and Jen Mann one last time. We hope to see you this Saturday night!!! We’ll be drinking Trader Joes Simpler Times and hanging out from 6-10pm.

“I’m Here Now” Video Premiere

Joe Lumbroso spent a short afternoon with his best friend Mark Warren Jacques to talk about the upcoming show at Gallery Hijinks titled “I’m Here Now”. Watch as Joe interviews Mark about what influences his art and finds out what “I’m Here Now” even means.

Interview with Langdon Graves

Guest blogger, Karanina Leigh, recently conducted a fabulous interview with New York based artist, Langdon Graves. After receiving three large graphite drawings for the upcoming group exhibition Highly Contagious at Gallery Hijinks, we were all very curious to understand the concepts and motivation behind these amazing works of art.

Langdon Graves Gallery Hijinks drawing

Karanina Leigh: I find myself having a closer, more personalized relationship with the subjects in your latest drawings. What has been your primary consideration in the creation of these new works?

Langdon Graves: My work is always about the body and transformation – aging, degeneration, healing – and the role of belief in these processes. I research a lot for my work in the areas of scientific medicine and religion – two systems we’ve developed to try to understand ourselves – and it leads me down some interesting paths. For this work, I found myself seeking out origin myths and became particularly interested in superstitions & folklore, which is where much of the imagery in these drawings came from.

Langdon_Graves_Hold

Langdon_Graves_Hold_detail

KL: Explain to me the involvement of animalistic imagery in these recent drawings.

LG: It started with hares. I read a North American Indian myth about a hare who tricked a woman into becoming pregnant with twins, and in anger she struck his lip and split it. There are many versions of the story, but in all of them the hare represents duality. I was already making some drawings with twins and doubled imagery, so I was attracted to these stories. The hare shows up often throughout folkloric and religious art and literature from all around the world, symbolizing fertility, lunar cycles, even the Virgin Mary. The use of animal symbolism is logical – animals are close to us in that they think and feel, but lack the consciousness to process those experiences, which puts us at a safe distance from which we can blame or worship them for our actions, appreciating them as an imperfect reflection. I started a birds series this summer, which has been fun to research.

Langdon_Graves_the_lovers

KL: I’ve read in a recent interview that you have an interest in epigenetics and quantum physics. Can you explain to me what your relationship with these fields of study has been/is?

LG: Well, I mostly relate through endless fascination with what little I can get my head around. What these sciences represent for me is the ongoing search for truths – or the dismantling of what we thought was true – that continues to generate theories about energy, matter, higher consciousness, and how we make meaning.

I listen to the radio a lot while I draw and one of my favorite programs is To the Best of Our Knowledge, which is like a bibliography for more reading and listening. Through this program I came across the research of Bruce Lipton in the field of Epigenetics, which proposes that our genetic code is not as static as we thought, but that it’s susceptible to its environment – like we are – and that our bodies can be altered at the cellular level in reaction to changes made at other levels. What I enjoy so much about Lipton’s research is the parallel he draws between the affects on cells by their surroundings and how our bodies are affected by our day-to-day surroundings, which we create and control. One of his suppositions is that there is a measurable correlation between mind and body, which is a step into murky territory science shares with philosophy and religion. Honestly, I don’t have the right kind of brain for this stuff – it wanders too quickly. Luckily I’m in a profession that permits me to make poetry from it.

Langdon_Graves_Sister

KL: How do you portray your interest in these subjects through your works, specifically in your drawings?

LG: Big ideas are fed from smaller streams and within those are the personal accounts and human factor. Though I want to communicate universal ideas, it’s the individual narratives that make them real. In order to relate to anything we need to be able to empathize, and I want the subjects in my drawings to deliver empathy. Art has always served as a cultural illustration, so in a way I’m contributing to the tradition of using it to externalize and objectify our beliefs and values. But beyond presenting ideas and symbols, I’m interested in applying them directly and perversely to the human body to signify the power of belief to create and alter reality.

Langdon_Graves_Monstrae-no.4

KL: How long does it normally take you to execute a new work?

LG: Depending on the size and complexity of a drawing, it could take a week, two weeks, three… Sculpture is all over the place – I might make a piece in a week but sit on it for two months before deciding it’s done. I like to work in series, so the pieces feel more complete when they are surrounded by one another.

KL: What is the reasoning for keeping so much negative space in your drawings?

LG: The white space around the subjects in the drawings is meant to isolate them. It also creates a clinical environment for the imagery, since I often think of the subjects as patients.

Langdon_Graves_Never_Forever

KL: Have you been working with any new materials or colors lately with either your sculptures or drawings?

LG: A lot of the new work features a faded aqua green, which is a departure from my usual palette of more bodily hues – pinks, reds, beiges, yellows, whites. It’s a nice contrast. Color is powerful and conjures immediate associations, which can steer a viewer into the wrong direction. My sculptures tend to be more colorful than my drawings because there’s a good relationship between the textures and colors of the materials I work with. I use color with a lot of restraint in my drawings because it feels like a different language than the graphite. I use it when the graphite can’t communicate what I want to say.

Langdon_Graves_studio_sculpture

KL: Are there any upcoming projects you are involved in that we should keep an eye out for?

LG: I’m going to be collaborating with a friend who is a product designer on a project in Sweden early next year. I like the thought of blending our two practices and playing with definitions of art, design and function. And I like Swedish meatballs.

To see more of Langdon Graves work please join us for the opening reception of Highly Contagious at Gallery Hijinks this Saturday, September 18th 2010 from 6-10pm.

Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
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