Tag: print making

Sebastian Wahl’s Moog Collage Mural

Sebastian Wahl never ceases to amaze me. Check out this extra large collage mural he made for Moog Fest 2011.

New Prints by Beau Stanton

We recently released a new print in coordination with Beau Stanton’s solo exhibition, Sanguine Machine. Check out our new arrivals in the Gallery Hijinks Shop.

deusexmachinaDeus Ex Machina print is an archival giclee print of original oil painting, it is 13″ x 14″ and signed by artist.

kaleidoscopeKaleidoscope print is an archival print that’s 10″ x 8″ and signed by artist.

gunshotGunshot print is an archival print that’s 10″ x 8″ and signed by artist..

New Prints by Lisa Congdon

Check out Lisa Congdon‘s new prints at our online shop! Archival prints of original pencil drawings, available in 8.5″ x 11″ & 11″ x 14″.

standingguardStanding Guard

dothethingDo The Thing

hereandnowHere and Now

st_basilsSt. Basil’s

vintage_eddymerckxVintage Eddy Merckx

Studio Visit: Adam Cimerman

Last week we visited the studio of Adam Cimerman, an artist who focuses is on creating art based on his memories of youth, travel, love, music and all the good old memories that make you smile with nostalgia. His Beatles Record collage series is influenced by Pop Art icons such as Andy Warhol, Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, while his works on paper and sculptures pay homage to Schwitters, Joseph Cornell, Claes Oldenburg, and Alexander Calder.

Adam Cart

“I became interested in the possibilities of transferring these “images” into collage and relief constructions. I soon began experimenting with enlarged xerox reproductions of my images, drawings and pages of journal entries. The first successful and satisfying piece that incorporated these is entitled “ubi sunt” (where are they). Ubi Sunt consists of mandala-like, raised, concentric surfaces collaged with maps, aerial views of pyramids, and an exhaustive list of every person that I knew up to that point in time. It was completed only after I discovered a xerox consultant who agreed to let me introduce newsprint paper into copiers (normally jamming them). Ubi Sunt (1977-1980), was completed around the time I graduated with distinction from the Academy of Art College, in San Francisco, now known as The Academy of Art University.”- Adam Cimerman

In the following years, Cimerman has made art in large studio spaces across San Francisco in which he works with mediums such as collage, collograph prints, oversize relief constructions and shadow boxes. His most recent works are available through our online shop.

Adam's studio

IMG_0450

Top Twenty. Made with paint, record sleaves, collage encased in resin on wood.

24″ x 33″

Adam's studio

art by Adam Cart

Beatles, Records VIII. Made with paint, vintage japanesse paper, record sleaves, collage encased in resin on wood. 12″ x 21″

Adam's studio

“By the age of eleven, I was collecting discarded small objects and glueing them to board before forever painting them monochromatically white,or off white. As the metals rusted through – I added more paint (I had not yet discovered metal primer). Regrettably, nothing of these early efforts of mine today survives. As i was actively discouraged from pursuing art as a career choice , in the years to come it became something of a shadow life for me and I spent a typically dismal teenaged years yearning to leave Buffalo for New York City, or Boston- which I did in my own fashion… dressing like a hobo and hitchhiking whenever the chance arose.” -Adam Cimerman

Adam Cart

Adam's studio

art by Adam Cart

Beatles, Records II. Made with vinage stamps, record leaves encased in resin. 21″ x 21″

Adam's studio

Drawings by Adam Cart

art by Adam Cart

Where It’s @. Relief collage with xeroxed aerial view of the Bay Area encased in resin on wood blocks. 18″ x 24″

key chair collection

Paintings

art by Adam Cart

Music to work to

yellow backyard

art by Adam Cart

Beatles, Records V. Made with paint, perferrated vintage paper, record sleaves, collage encased in resin on wood. 21″ x 21″

kermit chair

art by Adam Cart

Beatles Underground. Made with paint, vintage London underground map, record sleaves, collage encased in resin on wood. 21″ x 21″

San Francisco houses

art by Adam Cart

A Short, Early History of Madonna’s Selx Life. Made with plaster, paint, clay sculpture, photography, & collage in resin. 16″ x 20″

Adan Cart

Thanks to Adam for the invitation to explore your art space and to Whitney Lasker for the photographs you see here.

Studio Visit: Erik Otto

I’ve known Erik Otto for a number of years and have always been amazed by his work. It seems he bears his heart on the canvas. Bright colors, organic forms, dripping paint and an ever evolving concept in his work has made him a popular artist for number of publications, residencies and exhibitions nation wide. Recently we went over to his art studio to check up on a few things he has lined up for this year.

Erik OttoErik Otto in his Mission art studio.

shared warehouseErik shares a warehouse space with these artist who work with a variety a mediums including sewing, photography and woodwork.

woodshopHe’s also crafted a wood shop which he’s currently using to construct a glass house.

glass house

glass house detail

Erik Otto

Every single thing inside Erik’s studio has been reclaimed, mainly from his residence time at the SF Dump: from his paint, brushes, and wood panels to his flat files, tools and electronics.

inside the studio

paint

shelves of art stuff

materials

detail of painting

studio

how it all begins

brushes

detail shot

caps

paint brushes

paint cans

studioThe studio has a beautiful view of the Mission District from Potrero Hill to Bernal Heights.

Potrero Hill

Bernal Heights

erik and his workOtto’s most recent work has been focused on the idea of opposing forces, light vs. dark, color vs. monochrome, and so on. The current collection has a repetitive them of circles, which really to draw the eye in.

four panel painting

detail

light vs. dark

O This painting is available on our online shop.

work table

Erik OttoThank you Erik for inviting us over for a delightful visit. We love you!!!

To learn more about Erik Otto visit his website at erikotto.com.

Need a Valentines Day present?

Are you looking for something special for your special someone? Well we’ve got you covered! These super adorable prints by Timothy Karpinski are a sure pleaser. For a limited time, Wednesday February 9th through Saturday February 12th, we’re offering a special Valentines Day package.

For only $50 each you’ll receive a limited edition screenprint, holiday card, free surprise gift, and chocolates. Packages are ready to go. This Timothy Karpinski package of love will make your Valentines Day forever memorable. (Have I gotten too mooshy… sorry I can’t help myself.)

Meet Me Behind The Tree by Timothy Karpinski

Grow Together Print by Timothy Karpinski. Limited Edition Screen-print, Hand-Screened by the artist, Edition of 50, 12″x19″ in., 4 colors, Printed on French Paper, Company 140 lb. Muscle tone Heavyweight Paper and Custom doodle on back by the artist.

Grow Together by Timothy Karpinski

Meet Me Behind The Tree Print by Timothy Karpinksi. Limited Edition Screenprint, Hand-screened by the artist along with tiny spoon screenprint shop – Portland, Or, Edition of 50, 4 colors, Printed on French Paper Company 100lb. Construction Paper, Hand signed and numbered with a custom doodle on the back by the artist.

Timothy Karpinski postcards

You’ll receive one of the four Pinski cards and envelope, signed by the artist himself, and of coures who doesn’t appreciate chocolate!

chocolate valentines day

Email jillian@galleryhijinks.com or call us at (415) 371-9330 to place your order today. Credit cards, cash, and check accepted. xoxo

Interview: Sebastian Wahl

Sebastian Wahl’s gearing up for his exhibition Kaleidoscope Eyes opening this Saturday February 5th, 2011 from 6-10pm. We got to interview him about his work and inspirations. Enjoy.

Gallery Hijinks: As a teenager you took a graffiti trip to New York from your hometown in Sweden and then decided that The Big Apple was your home. What was the draw to NY?

Sebastian Wahl: I was 16 years old and all that I cared about at that time was graffiti, so initially it was graffiti that drew me to NYC. Once there I realized how amazing the urban maze is. What I saw and experienced there in 7 days was just the tip of an iceberg, I wanted more.

Sebastian Wahl

GH: In your biography, you say that it was at your father’s advertising agency that acquainted you with collage and the exacto knife. Please explain how your upbringing has impacted your work today.

SW: I would say that my upbringing impacted my work in a very positive way. I think both of my parents realized that I was a dreamer and encouraged me to try to harness this in some kind of creative way.

GH: To me, this new collection of resin collage is a bit of departure from your previous works because they are design based and seem to have a Pop Art element to them. What was the inspiration to creating these works?

SW: You are right. This series has more of a pop art feel to it than my past work. My goal was to play with the negative space and try to keep everything very clean. There are still a lot of images in each piece but leaving the background white and using repeated imagery gives this body of work more of a pop feel which I think makes it easier to digest and more accessible to the viewer.

Spirit Bird by Sebastian Wahl

The inspiration for the kaleidoscope series came from being a fan of kaleidoscopes. As you know I love making Mandalas and these collages felt like a natural route for me to take. Plus, I love repetition and I rarely play around with it, so this was my chance.

GH: What does Kaleidoscope Eyes mean to you?

SW: It’s a line from the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds. Kaleidoscope eyes to me is a reference to hallucinating. As for using it as the title for the show, I have to give credit to my wife-she suggested using it.

GH: Your work always seems to have a psychedelic element to it. Have you ever been inspired by drugs you’ve taken, or am I jumping to conclusions?

SW: Psychedelics have absolutely been a source of inspiration for me. I will give you an example, the first time I ever did LSD I ended up at a friends house and she had a poster on the wall. It was a big mandala that I spent a large part of that evening melting in and out. The following day I decided to go back to my friends place and trace her poster. The tracing I did of that mandala became the outline that I used for my first mandala collage. It was also the second large-scale collage that I had made at that point. That experience alone and what came out of it is a big part of why I still do what I do today.

Mandala 4 by Sebastian Wahl

GH: What is your process in making the resin collages and how long does it take? Do you use multiple prints of the same image? Give us the lowdown.

SW: My process has naturally evolved and changed over the years. In the beginning, I tried to stay clear of the copy machine and only use images cut directly out of magazines. Eventually I realized that magazine print fades much faster than a color copy does, so the canon color copy machine and I became friends. At this stage I would keep my collection of images in categorized boxes. I worked like this for many years until a couple of years ago when I stared to scan my images and build a library in my computer I have since started the endless process of cutting them out in the computer using a Wacom Tablet. The decision to do this came when I started to use the resin in my process. Since I now layer the images in between layers of clear resin, it made sense to initiate the collage in Photo Shop. In Photoshop, I layer the images too.. so in this way I now know between what layers of resin each image is going to land. I use Photo Shop to create the original collage. Then I print out each individual image, cut it out by hand, glue it down, paint it with clear medium to protect it, and then pour resin over it. The resin hardens over night so I can get back to work on the following layer the next day. Depending of the size and intricacy of the piece it can take anywhere from a month to four months to complete one collage.

GH: Where or how do you acquire your images? Do you collect images and then fit them together, or do you start with the idea and then search for those specific pieces to fit the puzzle?

SW: I look for images everywhere constantly. This is one of the most important parts of what I do. I can’t go out and buy paint so I have to always be on a search for new material to keep things fresh. Since I now scan everything I will source images from books magazines or just about anywhere I find them.

I usually start with an idea in the form of an outline of sorts and then I look for images to fill those spaces. An image might find its place in one of my collages because of color or shape or a number of other reasons.

GH: What’s your favorite band or artist to listen to while you work?

SW: I love to listen to music when I work. I usually like to listen to playlists that are really long this way I don’t have to stop what I am doing to figure out what to play next. Sometimes it’s a mix of different artists and sometimes I pick one artist and listen to every album that band or artist ever did. But my taste in music is all over the place. I LOVE Jimi Hendrix, Bob Marley, and Bob Dylan. But I also listen to a lot of electronicia. I am a huge fan of Bassnectar.

Jimi Hendrix

GH: Lastly, who are some of your favorite artists and why?

SW: Let me give you a shorted version, otherwise we would be here all day.

Of the artists that are alive today I would say Alex Grey’s work is inspirational for a number of reasons. I think that he is amazing at capturing your imagination. I love his attention to detail and the subjects that he chooses to depict are usually packed with symbolism and spirit, all of which I love.

Another living artist that blows my mind is Fred Tomaselli. Tomaselli inspires me on many levels. We share a love for the same medium. It was after seeing a show by him at the James Cohan Gallery in NYC, 2006 that I was inspired to use resin in my process. Beside the fact that his work is transcendental and beautiful, he is also very successful. That gives me hope as a fellow collage artist, I look up to him.

Fred Tomaselli

I also love the work of Matthew Barney. In the midst of all that Vaseline, he still manages to be so incredibly prolific. His body of work is beyond my comprehension. Everything he does seems so weird yet so beautiful. He turns my imagination up to eleven.

Of all the great dead artists out there, two come to mind right away. Salvador Dali and Mati Klarwein. Dali painted the most visionary and beautiful surrealist paintings that anyone has ever seen. His paintings leave you with a feeling of amazement, and on top of that the man himself was art. He could have been a character in one of Matthew Barney’s movies. I am forever grateful for the never-ending fountain of inspiration he left us all.

Temptation by Salvador Dali

Mati Klarwein. If I were a painter, I would paint in the style of Mati. To me his paintings are like collages. This is not the only reason why I am drawn to his work. Much like Alex Grey, he has a way of transporting me. His attention to detail never fails to amaze me. His subject matter is mystical and shamanic. It holds all the qualities of a true visionary.

blessing-1965 by Mati Klarwein

Gallery Hijinks Interview with Sebastian Wahl
GH:
As a teenager you took a graffiti trip to New York from your hometown in Sweden and then decided that The Big Apple was your home. What was the draw to NY?
SW:
I was 16 years old and all that I cared about at that time was graffiti, so initially it was graffiti that drew me to NYC. Once there I realized how amazing the urban maze is. What I saw and experienced there in 7 days was just the tip of an iceberg, I wanted more.
GH:
How would you describe the art scene in Sweden today?
SW:
I am embarrassed to say but my experience with the Stockholm art scene is very limited. I go back home once a year tops, and when I am there it’s all about friends and family. Is that lame of me? Sorry Sweden! I love you! I just like the art scene in San Fran better.
GH:
In your biography, you say that it was at your father’s advertising agency that acquainted you with collage and the exacto knife.  Please explain how your upbringing has impacted your work today.
SW:
I would say that my upbringing impacted my work in a very positive way. I think both of my parents realized that I was a dreamer and encouraged me to
try to harness this in some kind of creative way.
GH:
To me, this new collection of resin collage is a bit of departure from your previous works because they are design based and seem to have a Pop Art element to them. What was the inspiration to creating these works?
SW:
You are right. This series has more of a pop art feel to it than my past work. My goal was to play with the negative space and try to keep everything very clean. There are still a lot of images in each piece but leaving the background white and using repeated imagery gives this body of work more of a pop feel which I think makes it easier to digest and more accessible to the viewer.
The inspiration for the kaleidoscope series came from being a fan of kaleidoscopes. As you know I love making Mandalas and these collages felt like a natural route for me to take. Plus, I love repetition and I rarely play around with it. so this was my chance.
GH:
What does Kaleidoscope Eyes mean to you?
SW:
It’s a line from the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.
Kaleidoscope eyes to me is a reference to hallucinating. As for using it as the title for the show, I have to give credit to my wife-she suggested using it.
GH:
Your work always seems to have a psychedelic element to it. Have you ever been inspired by drugs you’ve taken, or am I jumping to conclusions?
SW:
Psychedelics have absolutely been a source of inspiration for me. I will give you an example, the first time I ever did LSD I ended up at a friends house and she had a poster on the wall. It was a big mandala that I spent a large part of that evening melting in and out. The following day I decided to go back to my friends place and trace her poster. The tracing I did of that mandala became the outline that I used for my first mandala collage. It was also the second large-scale collage that I had made at that point. That experience alone and what came out of it is a big part of why I still do what I do today.
GH:
What is your process in making the resin collages and how long does it take? Do you use multiple prints of the same image?  Give us the lowdown.
SW:
My process has naturally evolved and changed over the years.
In the beginning, I tried to stay clear of the copy machine and only use images cut directly out of magazines. Eventually I realized that magazine print fades much faster than a color copy does, so the canon color copy machine and I became friends. At this stage I would keep my collection of images in categorized boxes. I worked like this for many years until a couple of years ago when I stared to scan my images and build a library in my computer I have since started the endless process of cutting them out in the computer using a Wacom Tablet. The decision to do this came when I started to use the resin in my process. Since I now layer the images in between layers of clear resin, it made sense to initiate the collage in Photo Shop. In Photoshop, I layer the images too.. so in this way I now know between what layers of resin each image is going to land. I use Photo Shop to create the original collage. Then I print out each individual image, cut it out by hand, glue it down, paint it with clear medium to protect it, and then pour resin over it. The resin hardens over night so I can get back to work on the following layer the next day. Depending of the size and intricacy of the piece it can take anywhere from a month to four months to complete one collage.
GH:
Where or how do you acquire your images? Do you collect images and then fit them together, or do you start with the idea and then search for those specific pieces to fit the puzzle?
SW:
I look for images everywhere constantly. This is one of the most important parts of what I do. I can’t go out and buy paint so I have to always be on a search for new material to keep things fresh.  Since I now scan everything I will source images from books magazines or just about anywhere I find them.
I usually start with an idea in the form of an outline of sorts and then I look for images to fill those spaces. An image might find its place in one of my collages because of color or shape or a number of other reasons.
GH:
What’s your favorite band or artist to listen to while you work?
SW:
I love to listen to music when I work. I usually like to listen to playlists that are really long this way I don’t have to stop what I am doing to figure out what to play next. Sometimes it’s a mix of different artists and sometimes I pick one artist and listen to every album that band or artist ever did. But my taste in music is all over the place. I LOVE Jimi Hendrix, Bob Marley, and Bob Dylan. But I also listen to a lot of electronicia. I am a huge fan of Bassnectar.
GH:
Lastly, who are some of your favorite artists and why?
SW:
Let me give you a shorted version, otherwise we would be here all day.
Of the artists that are alive today I would say Alex Grey’s work is inspirational for a number of reasons. I think that he is amazing at capturing your imagination. I love his attention to detail and the subjects that he chooses to depict are usually packed with symbolism and spirit, all of which I love. Another living artist that blows my mind is Fred Tomaselli. Tomaselli inspires me on many levels. We share a love for the same medium. It was after seeing a show by him at the James Cohan Gallery in NYC, 2006 that I was inspired to use resin in my process. Beside the fact that his work is transcendental and beautiful, he is also very successful. That gives me hope as a fellow collage artist, I look up to him. I also love the work of Mathew Barney. In the midst of all that Vaseline, he still manages to be so incredibly prolific. His body of work is beyond my comprehension. Everything he does seems so weird yet so beautiful. He turns my imagination up to eleven.
Of all the great dead artists out there, two come to mind right away. Salvador Dali and Mati Klarwein. Dali painted the most visionary and beautiful surrealist paintings that anyone has ever seen. His paintings leave you with a feeling of amazement, and on top of that the man himself was art. He could have been a character in one of Matthew Barney’s movies. I am forever grateful for the never-ending fountain of inspiration he left us all. Mati Klarwein. If I were a painter, I would paint in the style of Mati. To me his paintings are like collages. This is not the only reason why I am drawn to his work. Much like Alex Grey, he has a way of transporting me. His attention to detail never fails to amaze me. His subject matter is mystical and shamanic. It holds all the qualities of a true visionary.

New Print: Martin Machado

SalmonPrint

Digital print of “Canned Salmon Paintingoil painting by Martin Machado. This 12″ x 16″ print is on sturdy flat white paper, signed and numbered by the artist. There’s only a few left of the edition of 28. Get them while they’re hot at our online store.

Artist Feature: Dennis McNett

The first time I was fortunate enough to experience the work of Dennis McNett was at Scope Art Fair in Miami this past December 2010. His gigantic Santa Muerte stands 120 inches high and is made of hand colored wood cut prints, paper mache and wood. I regretfully didn’t get to see the  “Reaping Waves and Vital Vessels The Passing of the Wolfbats” exhibition showing until January 22nd at Joshua Liner Gallery but these installation photos were most impressive.

McNett Install Wave

dennis mcnett installation

According to the press release: “The size of the ship is important,” says McNett. “It represents an invasion into whatever space it inhabits and is large enough to be collaborative. It’s an armature for communal ritual, big enough to facilitate everyone’s work.” It is McNett’s intention to celebrate collectivity and collaboration in the construction of the ships, the tradition of storytelling, the energy of the procession, and the egalitarian medium of printmaking itself.

boat

The show includes wood and linocut works on paper and muslin, large carved-wood panels that are hand-colored in acrylic, inked, and finished, as well as free standing sculpture. You can see a great deal of mythology, folklore and story telling in his work. “His encouragement as a kid came from his blind grandfather, who told him over and over again that his drawings were good. Later influences came from the raw high-energy imagery pouring out of the early 80’s skateboard and punk rock scene.” -McNett

birds

wolf

muerte

Opening Reception of As It Was Before

Thanks to all of our friends and family who came out last Saturday for the opening reception of As It Was Before new works by Martin Machado and Todd Freeman with installations by Aleksandra Zee. For those who couldn’t make it, here’s a little recap of the nights events.

Marty and Allie

Marty and Allie

Todd Freeman Copper and hand painted prints

Todd Freeman copper and hand painted prints

Martin Machado oil paintings and photographs

Martin Machado oil paintings and photographs

Installation shot of Aleksandra Zee's nests

Installation shot of Aleksandra Zee's nests

Nest in the corner, art on the walls.

girl

girls

Gallery Hijinks

Gallery Hijinks

Strangers in the night

Strangers in the night

Todd Freeman

Todd Freeman

Aleksandra Zee

Aleksandra Zee

The Scene

The Scene

Thanks to Asiento for providing an amazing after party!

Thanks to Asiento for providing an amazing after party!

For more pictures of the opening reception, visit our flickr page.

Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
All content & imagery are copyright © Gallery Hijinks 2017 & its artists.
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