Tag: Robert Minervini

Let’s Review…

Holy holy!  It’s the end of the year already and looking back through the past twelve months, I’m really impressed by how great the art and shows were, and also dismayed by how I forgot some of them. So, in case all y’alls have forgotten because of the barrage of great art you have encountered over the year, let’s review and savor one last time before the end of the world comes (it’ll be 2012, after all).

We began the year with As It Was Before, a two person show by Martin Machado and Todd Freeman with install by Aleksandra Zee.

Ghost Fish by Martin Machado

Ghost Fish by Martin Machado

Torch Lake by Todd Freeman

Torch Lake by Todd Freeman

Then on to February with the resin collage work of Sebastian Wahl‘s Kaleidoscope Eyes.

Kaleidoscope Eye 4 by Sebastian Wahl

Kaleidoscope Eye 4 by Sebastian Wahl

In March we had The Letter Collector which was a massive group show with all the artists showing their love of script and type.

Z by Eli Harris

Z by Eli Harris

S by Damon Macgregor

S by Damon Macgregor

With April came American Mythic, Peter Gronquist‘s use of ebay items and mixed media to create a variety of interesting and tongue-in-cheek works.

American Mythic by Peter Gronquist

American Mythic by Peter Gronquist

Robert Minervini‘s Sunken Dreams owned May with the geodesic domes settled in quiet dystopian landscapes.

Under the Influence of the Season by Robert Minervini

Under the Influence of the Season by Robert Minervini

June was a healthy serving of Bad Casserole, David Bayus‘ mixed media works.

That Museum Visit by David Bayus

That Museum Visit by David Bayus

July came with Lisa Congdon‘s Icelandic inspired works in Boreas with installation by Sarah Applebaum.

Antarctic Camper by Lisa Congdon

Antarctic Camper by Lisa Congdon

Extra Dimensional Quilt by Sarah Applebaum

Extra Dimensional Quilt by Sarah Applebaum

We had Gregory Ito‘s Point of Vision, an exploration in broadening his own perception on time for the whole of August.

As the Sun sets with Grace by Gregory Ito

As the Sun sets with Grace by Gregory Ito

Post-apocalyptic Sanguine Machine: Antedeluvian Artifacts from Futures Past by Beau Stanton presented us with creation/destruction in September.

Mortality Mask by Beau Stanton

Mortality Mask by Beau Stanton

Pakayla Biehn had October superimposed and double-exposed with her paintings in (t)here.

On and Ever Onward by Pakayla Biehn

On and Ever Onward by Pakayla Biehn

And last but not very least, we finish out the year with Scott Greenwalt‘s Alchemist, delving into what “change” really means.

Thousands of Years ago in the Future by Scott Greenwalt

Thousands of Years ago in the Future by Scott Greenwalt

Dang. That’s a lotta good art.

The New Guard

We received the latest issue of 7×7 Magazine yesterday and are pleased to be in company with new art galleries such as Baer Rigdgway, Ever Gold, Guerro Gallery and McLoughlin Gallery. As 7×7′s Allison McCarthy states, “Wake up: It’s art o’clock. We peek into five of the city’s newest galleries to find out what they’re showing, which local artists their watching, and how to start your own collection here and now.”

If you get a chance to pick up the July 2011 issue, make sure to check out The New Guard feature on Gallery Hijinks, page 60.

7x7

Robert Minervini’s Paintings & Opening Reception Pics

We had a great time at the opening of Sunken Dreams by Robert Minervini and we hope you did too. We are psyched out of our minds because we love his work so much. We had an awesome opening reception, thanks to all you who made it out and we are looking forward to spending the rest of the month with Minervini’s work! We would like to take this time to show you some of his past paintings mixed with some new. Enjoy :)

G58CNo9Wo40lSq7SwF5iSGLVUnder the Influence of a Season_WebUnder the Influence of the Season

dumpTrial & Error

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trees_webForever in Debt

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room-with-a-viewRoom with a View

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wall-1_webConscious Input

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minervini2Invisible to the Naked Eye

Here are some quick snap shots from the opening reception, if you didn’t make it out… the work is still up so come on by and see whats good.
Robert Minervini

gallery hijins

karanina madden

hairs

peoples

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risa


Contemplation of Humanitarian Theory and The Sublime

Contemplation of Humanitarian Theory and The Sublime

Written by Libby Nicholaou

After spending a sunny San Francisco Saturday afternoon with Minervini, visiting the SFMOMA and listening to a talk on personal identity at the YBCA, I discovered he’s an artist who values the ideas of various creative individuals throughout history. He’s been particularly swept away by Buckminister Fuller’s theories on humanity and ingenuity of design, in particular with the geodesic dome. He recalls Fuller’s writing and quotes him as striving to be “the world’s most successful failure.” Through Fuller’s insistent efforts to seek new discoveries, it’s easy to understand why Minervini couples him with Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe’s writings on the sublime. Taking the influence of these men into account it is understood that much of what Minervini paints is a visual dialogue in response to the ways they probed at understanding humanity’s root nature and redemptive qualities.

The works, in Robert Minervini’s solo exhibition at Gallery Hijinks, focus on the idea of utopia by way of geodesic domes, desolate landscapes and radioactive colors. Although a young painter, Minervini has transformed much in his career, moving from painting purely figurative murals to the abstracted landscapes we see today. His choice to move towards abstraction was spurred by a realization that more can be said when blurring the lines of reality. As part of his evolution he’s removed the human figure from the canvas but says the figure is still a central role in his works. There is a real pleasure experienced when viewing these paintings, it is as though Minervini is creating a portal to undiscovered or abandoned planets that are mirrors of our world which have more to offer than believed before.

Setting humanity as the subject matter but not actually painting figures on the canvas opens a new space for the viewer to step in freely. Through the domes, Minervini provides the viewer with an image to look into, look out of, or step inside of. The geometric patterns of the domes and the still landscapes surrounding them invite the viewer to pause, while their eyes wonder over the canvas. As the viewer takes time to discover the paintings’ different characteristics, they see he has taken note of his art training by use of formal elements, such as color, texture and line. In most paintings, he’s created a sense of depth through the allusion to deep space, use of vanishing points carrying the eye deeper into the painting and selecting cool colors that remove anxiety from the mind and give a somber tone to the body of work. These elements open the paintings up and take the viewer to another location, often leaving them with a sensation of awe, which most of us forget to translate into the sublime.

Since moving to the bay area Minervini’s path has included much formal guidance as a recent fine arts graduate from the San Francisco Art Institute, former resident with the Headlands Center for The Arts and resident artist at Root Division. He is able to realize that as individuals we are able to translate many complex things in life but with art not even the artist can provide a full translation. They can explain their technique, philosophy, and intent behind each interacting element within a composition; but to assign a definite meaning would flatten one’s experience.

Through my Saturday afternoon with Minervini I realized this even more as he continued to talk about the connection between the sublime, beauty, and art. Most of us who studied the liberal arts in school have an understanding of their differences but here Rolfe gives us a reminder in saying, “Thus in Schiller beauty is inferior to the sublime because the latter leads to a condition of thought which is independent of all sensuous affects,’ which is to say, of all that is fundamental to the beautiful.” In Minervini’s paintings, the abstract touches on the sublime carrying the viewer beyond their meaning, to a possibility for more understanding than what is before our eyes.

Robert Minervini: Sunken Dreams Video

As a busy weekend approaches of art auctions, exhibitions, and events, we’ve spotlighted a San Francisco artist who’s taken the surrounding environment and translated it into beautiful paintings for his solo exhibition titled Sunken Dreams. Check out what Robert Minervini has to say about his influences, views on art and upcoming exhibition.

Please join us for the opening reception on May 7th, 2011 from 6-11pm.

Video By Third Street Works.

Today we install the windows

windows

Artist video in the making.

Our lovely friends over at Lumbroso Productions have been working with artist, Robert Minervini, to produce a video about the process and inspiration behind the upcoming exhibition titled Sunken Dreams. Check out a few snapshots Hiro took from the shoot, and keep an eye out for the video in the coming week.

Robert Minervini's art studio

Inspiration station

art

Sunken Dreams

Sunken Dreams new works by Robert Minervini

Sunken Dreams_web

Gallery Hijinks proudly presents Sunken Dreams, a solo exhibition by Robert Minervini. The paintings in this new body of work are inspired by the history of the geodesic dome and are a continuation of the artist’s urban landscapes exploring utopian and dystopian environments. Please join us for the opening reception on May 7th, 2011 from 6-10pm.

The word Utopia originates from the literal Greek meaning “non place,” suggesting that perfection can only exist in the realm of imagination. Minervini’s work presents invented spaces that are based on reality, but revel in artificiality.  In these desolate dreamlike non-places, the artist subverts nature and constructs or destroys architectural sites alluding to the making of a utopian and/or dystopian environment.

“Sunken Dreams” suggests the potential futility of aspiring for a better future in the face of humanity’s self-destructiveness.   The inspiration for this series comes from the life and work of R. Buckminster Fuller who had, among other things, popularized the geodesic dome. Fuller had a vision for a utopian future, one which he saw as attainable through the innovation and implementation of science and engineering.  Fuller’s iconic dome structure was the pinnacle of his design and by implementing them into this body of work, the artist hopes to make a connection between Fuller’s ideologies through symbolically utilizing his structures.

Minervini draws reference from an archive of photographs both personal and researched in order to construct the environments within each composition. With this framework he then utilizes innovative painting techniques to create layer upon layer of depth and texture. Vibrant colors remove the image from its reality and call attention to the origin of the digital image. “While I am interested in the process of working from digitally processed imagery, I place a strong emphasis on spontaneity, materiality, and revealing the painting process.” The end result is an image where abandoned landscapes stretch to the horizon and vast ruins of urban decay slowly crumble under the beauty of a pastel sunset.

Robert Minervini received his MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2009, and his BFA from Tyler School of Art in 2005. His work has been exhibited nationally including Marine Contemporary, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Eleanor Harwood Gallery, The Brooklyn Historical Society, the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, and the Pennsylvania State Museum. He has been awarded the Murphy/Cadogan Fellowship by the San Francisco Foundation in 2008, and the Edwin Austin Abbey Mural Fellowship by the National Academy of Fine Arts in 2008. He has been a resident artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Root Division Studio Program. His work has been published in New American Painting No.91, and Mural Art: Large Scale Art from Walls Around the World.

Sunken Dreams opens May 7th, 2011 and will be on display until May 28th, 2011 and is open to the public.

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The Letter Collector Teaser

We proudly  present The Letter Collector, and exhibition of over 50 artists. This massive group show is based on our common love of type and script. The viewer will experience an assortment of letters expressed through a range of mediums: drawing, painting, photography, neon, sculpture, video and mixed media. Please join us for the opening reception this Saturday, March 5th, 2011 from 6-10pm at Gallery Hijinks!

Exhibiting artists include: Aaron Bo Heimlich, Alexandra ZeeAndrea Wan, Andrew Johnson, Andrew McCintockAustin McManusBeau StantonCasey GrayCatherine Ryan, Chris BlackstockChristian Rex Van MinnenChristopher DavisonClaire Colette, Cora Lanzisero, Damon MacGregor, David BayusDenise SantillanDustin KlienEli HarrisEric HelveErik OttoErik ParaFernando PizarroHannah StoufferJakub KalousekJason VivonaJing WeiJon Contino, Kyle Jorgensen, Lafe Eaves, Lisa CongdonLouise ChenMark Warren JacquesMatthew ReamerMeryl PatakyMike GiantMolly BosleyMorgan BlairNas ChompasPakayla BiehnTimothy KarpinskiRich PellegrinoRobert MinerviniRosie HannaRussell LengRyan De La HozRyan Riss, Sarah Patterson, Sean Somers, Seth NeefusShea Greene, Tanya Behar, Uri Korn, Whitney Lasker, Viktor Layne, and Yellena James.



Studio Visit: Robert Minervini

Robert Minervini has a full year ahead of him: Yerba Buena Center of Arts, Marine Contemporary and of course Gallery Hijinks. The works for his Gallery Hijinks solo exhibition titled “Sunken Dreams” are focused one the most successful architectural failure, the geodesic dome. Although his show is months away we caught up with Rob and snagged some photographs of rough inspiration mock ups as well the the beginnings of some quite interesting paintings.

Robert Minervini dome

Robert Minervini dome

Robert Minervini supplies

Robert Minervini inspiration

Robert Minervini N

Robert Minervini taping methods

Robert Minervini painting

Robert Minervini taping methods

Robert Minervini

Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
All content & imagery are copyright © Gallery Hijinks 2014 & its artists.
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