Tag: Sebastian Wahl

Let’s Review…

Holy holy!  It’s the end of the year already and looking back through the past twelve months, I’m really impressed by how great the art and shows were, and also dismayed by how I forgot some of them. So, in case all y’alls have forgotten because of the barrage of great art you have encountered over the year, let’s review and savor one last time before the end of the world comes (it’ll be 2012, after all).

We began the year with As It Was Before, a two person show by Martin Machado and Todd Freeman with install by Aleksandra Zee.

Ghost Fish by Martin Machado

Ghost Fish by Martin Machado

Torch Lake by Todd Freeman

Torch Lake by Todd Freeman

Then on to February with the resin collage work of Sebastian Wahl‘s Kaleidoscope Eyes.

Kaleidoscope Eye 4 by Sebastian Wahl

Kaleidoscope Eye 4 by Sebastian Wahl

In March we had The Letter Collector which was a massive group show with all the artists showing their love of script and type.

Z by Eli Harris

Z by Eli Harris

S by Damon Macgregor

S by Damon Macgregor

With April came American Mythic, Peter Gronquist‘s use of ebay items and mixed media to create a variety of interesting and tongue-in-cheek works.

American Mythic by Peter Gronquist

American Mythic by Peter Gronquist

Robert Minervini‘s Sunken Dreams owned May with the geodesic domes settled in quiet dystopian landscapes.

Under the Influence of the Season by Robert Minervini

Under the Influence of the Season by Robert Minervini

June was a healthy serving of Bad Casserole, David Bayus‘ mixed media works.

That Museum Visit by David Bayus

That Museum Visit by David Bayus

July came with Lisa Congdon‘s Icelandic inspired works in Boreas with installation by Sarah Applebaum.

Antarctic Camper by Lisa Congdon

Antarctic Camper by Lisa Congdon

Extra Dimensional Quilt by Sarah Applebaum

Extra Dimensional Quilt by Sarah Applebaum

We had Gregory Ito‘s Point of Vision, an exploration in broadening his own perception on time for the whole of August.

As the Sun sets with Grace by Gregory Ito

As the Sun sets with Grace by Gregory Ito

Post-apocalyptic Sanguine Machine: Antedeluvian Artifacts from Futures Past by Beau Stanton presented us with creation/destruction in September.

Mortality Mask by Beau Stanton

Mortality Mask by Beau Stanton

Pakayla Biehn had October superimposed and double-exposed with her paintings in (t)here.

On and Ever Onward by Pakayla Biehn

On and Ever Onward by Pakayla Biehn

And last but not very least, we finish out the year with Scott Greenwalt‘s Alchemist, delving into what “change” really means.

Thousands of Years ago in the Future by Scott Greenwalt

Thousands of Years ago in the Future by Scott Greenwalt

Dang. That’s a lotta good art.

Sebastian Wahl’s Moog Collage Mural

Sebastian Wahl never ceases to amaze me. Check out this extra large collage mural he made for Moog Fest 2011.

Who doesn’t love paper?

Collage art has increasingly become more and more popular. Obviously we’re big fans exhibiting artists such as David Bayus and Sebastian Wahl whose work is heavily based on collage. Take a look at five artists who work with assemblages of different forms to  create new beautiful compositions.

chad-kouri-foundpaperbook6

Chad Kouri spends most of his time in alleys looking for treasures to build out his found-art collages and illustrations. The rest of his time is spent writing emails to people he has never met and other things to pass the day.

CadKouri-drafting-cosmos

chad-kouri_desktopwallpaperprojectCadKouri_ladies

CadKouri-wilco-kicking-television

CadKouri-story-time

CadKouri- let-there-be-geo

Texas-raised artist Erik Parra‘s collage works prominently feature photographic images with an abiding retro aesthetic (probably because they appear to be actual old photographs), dappled with blobs or confetti-like clouds of color. The appealing result is vibrant and surprising, humorous but also a bit eerie, as colors creep into a black-and-white plane like so many stills from a forgotten, more austere version of Pleasantville (1998). – Sam Stander

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Erik Parra

Renee Torres: “My inspiration for design is usually drawn from my love of photography and history. I am hugely drawn to traditional menswear from mid 1800s to 1980s, and like to incorporate details from historical costume through a modern silhouette. I love the romanticism of the past mixed with graphic, radiant, and natural images I find for a color story in fabrics. My creative process involved tons of research, collage, and in depth experimentation for textile design to create a golden story. Music and film also inform my process, as I’m always curiously finding new inspiration. To me, design is a curiousity and passion expressed in a functional object.”

Renee Torres

Renee Torres

Renee-Torres

Renee-Torres2

Renee-Torres3

Karen Kang‘s collages are created with recycled papers on pages taken from vintage books. The use of vibrant colors is important to her, as it contributes to the feeling of something new emerging from what has been discarded. She also creates art on book covers that are mounted onto recycled pieces of wood.

karenkang2

karenkang

While on his bedroom floor back in December 2002, artist Jack Azar experienced a moment of self-awakening. An already existing reality emerged with the aid of scissors and glue, used to combine magazine images and regarded today as his artwork medium.

Jack Azar Studios, Pretty Boy

Jack Azar Studios, Paradise Found

Pulse and Volta Art Fairs NYC 2011

Thanks to our buddy, Sebastian Wahl, for some exclusive Hijinks coverage of the art fairs happening in NEw York City this week!

Joohyun- Kim

Joohyun Kim

Joohyun- Kim

Joohyun- Kim

Bradley- Castellanos

Bradley Castellanos

Bradley Castellanos

Bradley Castellanos

Bradley Castellanos

Bradley Castellanos

Natasha Kissell

Natasha Kissell

Natasha Kissell

Natasha Kissell

Shay Kun

Shay Kun

Shay Kun

Shay Kun

Shay Kun

Shay Kun

Zak Ove

Zak Ove

Zak Ove

Zak Ove

Richard Colman

Richard Colman

Richard Colman

Richard Colman

Richard Colman

Richard Colman

Richard Colman

Richard Colman

Jorge Mayet

Jorge Mayet

Jorge Mayet

Jorge Mayet

Christina Empedocles

Christina Empedocles

Andrew Schoultz

Andrew Schoultz

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Agus Suwage

Agus Suwage

Alexis Peskine

Alexis Peskine

Alexis Peskine

Alexis Peskine

Yigal Ozeri

Yigal Ozeri

Yigal Ozeri

Yigal Ozeri

Sebastian Wahl’s SF trip and studio visit with Robert Hardgrave.

How time flies. It seems like yesterday that we were installing the kaleidoscope eyes in the front window for Sebastian Wahl‘s opening reception. If you haven’t got the chance to see the exhibition feel free to stop by the gallery before the closing on Saturday the 26th.

Here are some pictures of Sebastian’s visit to San Francisco as well as his studio visit with Robert Hardgrave.

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

Walter and Joe

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

sebastian wahl sf trip

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Robert Hardgrave's studio

Sebastian Wahl: Kaleidoscope Eyes Video

Opening Reception of Kaleidoscope Eyes

Thank you to all the friends and family that made it out for the opening reception of Sebastian Wahl’s solo exhibition: Kaleidoscope Eyes. Stencil artist, Casey Gray, and our trusty photographer Jesse chandler were there taking pictures. Check out what Casey had to say about the show and some quick spashots he took of the event. See the full post on his blog.

“This past Saturday, February 5th, marked the opening of Swedish born, New York City based artist Sebastian Wahl’s solo exhibition Kaleidascope Eyes at Gallery Hijinks in San Francisco. Sebastian is a good friend of mine and it was great to see all his new work in person. His collages encased in multi-layers of resin are extremely seductive and captivating. If you get a chance check out the show at 2309 Bryant Street in the Mission District.”

Photo Credit: Casey Gray

Gallery Hijinks

I can see myself in your eyes

Inside the Kaleidoscope Eyes

Sebastian Wahl, all smiles

detail shot of Mandala

Kevin Cyr and Lauren

Spirit Bird

detail shot

Pals

Photo Credit: Jesse Chandler

checking out the art, up close

detail shot of Mandala

Gallery Hijinks

Installation

collage

peeps

Window Installation

Good night

Kaleidoscope Eyes in San Francisco Chronicle

96 Hours writes up about  ‘Kaleidoscope Eyes’ by Sebastian Wahl opening Feb. 5, 2011.

96-hours

Mary Eisenhart: In his first solo exhibition on the West Coast, Swedish artist Sebastian Wahl offers resin collages based on mirrored images of nature, art, architecture, people, animals and spiritual symbols. At once precisely delineated and chaotic, they define their own worlds and invite exploration.

Reception 6 p.m. Sat. Through Feb. 26. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Fri., noon-6 p.m. Sat. Gallery Hijinks, 2309 Bryant St., S.F. (415) 371-9330. www.galleryhijinks.com.

This article appeared on page G – 12 of the San Francisco Chronicle.

Interview: Sebastian Wahl

Sebastian Wahl’s gearing up for his exhibition Kaleidoscope Eyes opening this Saturday February 5th, 2011 from 6-10pm. We got to interview him about his work and inspirations. Enjoy.

Gallery Hijinks: As a teenager you took a graffiti trip to New York from your hometown in Sweden and then decided that The Big Apple was your home. What was the draw to NY?

Sebastian Wahl: I was 16 years old and all that I cared about at that time was graffiti, so initially it was graffiti that drew me to NYC. Once there I realized how amazing the urban maze is. What I saw and experienced there in 7 days was just the tip of an iceberg, I wanted more.

Sebastian Wahl

GH: In your biography, you say that it was at your father’s advertising agency that acquainted you with collage and the exacto knife. Please explain how your upbringing has impacted your work today.

SW: I would say that my upbringing impacted my work in a very positive way. I think both of my parents realized that I was a dreamer and encouraged me to try to harness this in some kind of creative way.

GH: To me, this new collection of resin collage is a bit of departure from your previous works because they are design based and seem to have a Pop Art element to them. What was the inspiration to creating these works?

SW: You are right. This series has more of a pop art feel to it than my past work. My goal was to play with the negative space and try to keep everything very clean. There are still a lot of images in each piece but leaving the background white and using repeated imagery gives this body of work more of a pop feel which I think makes it easier to digest and more accessible to the viewer.

Spirit Bird by Sebastian Wahl

The inspiration for the kaleidoscope series came from being a fan of kaleidoscopes. As you know I love making Mandalas and these collages felt like a natural route for me to take. Plus, I love repetition and I rarely play around with it, so this was my chance.

GH: What does Kaleidoscope Eyes mean to you?

SW: It’s a line from the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds. Kaleidoscope eyes to me is a reference to hallucinating. As for using it as the title for the show, I have to give credit to my wife-she suggested using it.

GH: Your work always seems to have a psychedelic element to it. Have you ever been inspired by drugs you’ve taken, or am I jumping to conclusions?

SW: Psychedelics have absolutely been a source of inspiration for me. I will give you an example, the first time I ever did LSD I ended up at a friends house and she had a poster on the wall. It was a big mandala that I spent a large part of that evening melting in and out. The following day I decided to go back to my friends place and trace her poster. The tracing I did of that mandala became the outline that I used for my first mandala collage. It was also the second large-scale collage that I had made at that point. That experience alone and what came out of it is a big part of why I still do what I do today.

Mandala 4 by Sebastian Wahl

GH: What is your process in making the resin collages and how long does it take? Do you use multiple prints of the same image? Give us the lowdown.

SW: My process has naturally evolved and changed over the years. In the beginning, I tried to stay clear of the copy machine and only use images cut directly out of magazines. Eventually I realized that magazine print fades much faster than a color copy does, so the canon color copy machine and I became friends. At this stage I would keep my collection of images in categorized boxes. I worked like this for many years until a couple of years ago when I stared to scan my images and build a library in my computer I have since started the endless process of cutting them out in the computer using a Wacom Tablet. The decision to do this came when I started to use the resin in my process. Since I now layer the images in between layers of clear resin, it made sense to initiate the collage in Photo Shop. In Photoshop, I layer the images too.. so in this way I now know between what layers of resin each image is going to land. I use Photo Shop to create the original collage. Then I print out each individual image, cut it out by hand, glue it down, paint it with clear medium to protect it, and then pour resin over it. The resin hardens over night so I can get back to work on the following layer the next day. Depending of the size and intricacy of the piece it can take anywhere from a month to four months to complete one collage.

GH: Where or how do you acquire your images? Do you collect images and then fit them together, or do you start with the idea and then search for those specific pieces to fit the puzzle?

SW: I look for images everywhere constantly. This is one of the most important parts of what I do. I can’t go out and buy paint so I have to always be on a search for new material to keep things fresh. Since I now scan everything I will source images from books magazines or just about anywhere I find them.

I usually start with an idea in the form of an outline of sorts and then I look for images to fill those spaces. An image might find its place in one of my collages because of color or shape or a number of other reasons.

GH: What’s your favorite band or artist to listen to while you work?

SW: I love to listen to music when I work. I usually like to listen to playlists that are really long this way I don’t have to stop what I am doing to figure out what to play next. Sometimes it’s a mix of different artists and sometimes I pick one artist and listen to every album that band or artist ever did. But my taste in music is all over the place. I LOVE Jimi Hendrix, Bob Marley, and Bob Dylan. But I also listen to a lot of electronicia. I am a huge fan of Bassnectar.

Jimi Hendrix

GH: Lastly, who are some of your favorite artists and why?

SW: Let me give you a shorted version, otherwise we would be here all day.

Of the artists that are alive today I would say Alex Grey’s work is inspirational for a number of reasons. I think that he is amazing at capturing your imagination. I love his attention to detail and the subjects that he chooses to depict are usually packed with symbolism and spirit, all of which I love.

Another living artist that blows my mind is Fred Tomaselli. Tomaselli inspires me on many levels. We share a love for the same medium. It was after seeing a show by him at the James Cohan Gallery in NYC, 2006 that I was inspired to use resin in my process. Beside the fact that his work is transcendental and beautiful, he is also very successful. That gives me hope as a fellow collage artist, I look up to him.

Fred Tomaselli

I also love the work of Matthew Barney. In the midst of all that Vaseline, he still manages to be so incredibly prolific. His body of work is beyond my comprehension. Everything he does seems so weird yet so beautiful. He turns my imagination up to eleven.

Of all the great dead artists out there, two come to mind right away. Salvador Dali and Mati Klarwein. Dali painted the most visionary and beautiful surrealist paintings that anyone has ever seen. His paintings leave you with a feeling of amazement, and on top of that the man himself was art. He could have been a character in one of Matthew Barney’s movies. I am forever grateful for the never-ending fountain of inspiration he left us all.

Temptation by Salvador Dali

Mati Klarwein. If I were a painter, I would paint in the style of Mati. To me his paintings are like collages. This is not the only reason why I am drawn to his work. Much like Alex Grey, he has a way of transporting me. His attention to detail never fails to amaze me. His subject matter is mystical and shamanic. It holds all the qualities of a true visionary.

blessing-1965 by Mati Klarwein

Gallery Hijinks Interview with Sebastian Wahl
GH:
As a teenager you took a graffiti trip to New York from your hometown in Sweden and then decided that The Big Apple was your home. What was the draw to NY?
SW:
I was 16 years old and all that I cared about at that time was graffiti, so initially it was graffiti that drew me to NYC. Once there I realized how amazing the urban maze is. What I saw and experienced there in 7 days was just the tip of an iceberg, I wanted more.
GH:
How would you describe the art scene in Sweden today?
SW:
I am embarrassed to say but my experience with the Stockholm art scene is very limited. I go back home once a year tops, and when I am there it’s all about friends and family. Is that lame of me? Sorry Sweden! I love you! I just like the art scene in San Fran better.
GH:
In your biography, you say that it was at your father’s advertising agency that acquainted you with collage and the exacto knife.  Please explain how your upbringing has impacted your work today.
SW:
I would say that my upbringing impacted my work in a very positive way. I think both of my parents realized that I was a dreamer and encouraged me to
try to harness this in some kind of creative way.
GH:
To me, this new collection of resin collage is a bit of departure from your previous works because they are design based and seem to have a Pop Art element to them. What was the inspiration to creating these works?
SW:
You are right. This series has more of a pop art feel to it than my past work. My goal was to play with the negative space and try to keep everything very clean. There are still a lot of images in each piece but leaving the background white and using repeated imagery gives this body of work more of a pop feel which I think makes it easier to digest and more accessible to the viewer.
The inspiration for the kaleidoscope series came from being a fan of kaleidoscopes. As you know I love making Mandalas and these collages felt like a natural route for me to take. Plus, I love repetition and I rarely play around with it. so this was my chance.
GH:
What does Kaleidoscope Eyes mean to you?
SW:
It’s a line from the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.
Kaleidoscope eyes to me is a reference to hallucinating. As for using it as the title for the show, I have to give credit to my wife-she suggested using it.
GH:
Your work always seems to have a psychedelic element to it. Have you ever been inspired by drugs you’ve taken, or am I jumping to conclusions?
SW:
Psychedelics have absolutely been a source of inspiration for me. I will give you an example, the first time I ever did LSD I ended up at a friends house and she had a poster on the wall. It was a big mandala that I spent a large part of that evening melting in and out. The following day I decided to go back to my friends place and trace her poster. The tracing I did of that mandala became the outline that I used for my first mandala collage. It was also the second large-scale collage that I had made at that point. That experience alone and what came out of it is a big part of why I still do what I do today.
GH:
What is your process in making the resin collages and how long does it take? Do you use multiple prints of the same image?  Give us the lowdown.
SW:
My process has naturally evolved and changed over the years.
In the beginning, I tried to stay clear of the copy machine and only use images cut directly out of magazines. Eventually I realized that magazine print fades much faster than a color copy does, so the canon color copy machine and I became friends. At this stage I would keep my collection of images in categorized boxes. I worked like this for many years until a couple of years ago when I stared to scan my images and build a library in my computer I have since started the endless process of cutting them out in the computer using a Wacom Tablet. The decision to do this came when I started to use the resin in my process. Since I now layer the images in between layers of clear resin, it made sense to initiate the collage in Photo Shop. In Photoshop, I layer the images too.. so in this way I now know between what layers of resin each image is going to land. I use Photo Shop to create the original collage. Then I print out each individual image, cut it out by hand, glue it down, paint it with clear medium to protect it, and then pour resin over it. The resin hardens over night so I can get back to work on the following layer the next day. Depending of the size and intricacy of the piece it can take anywhere from a month to four months to complete one collage.
GH:
Where or how do you acquire your images? Do you collect images and then fit them together, or do you start with the idea and then search for those specific pieces to fit the puzzle?
SW:
I look for images everywhere constantly. This is one of the most important parts of what I do. I can’t go out and buy paint so I have to always be on a search for new material to keep things fresh.  Since I now scan everything I will source images from books magazines or just about anywhere I find them.
I usually start with an idea in the form of an outline of sorts and then I look for images to fill those spaces. An image might find its place in one of my collages because of color or shape or a number of other reasons.
GH:
What’s your favorite band or artist to listen to while you work?
SW:
I love to listen to music when I work. I usually like to listen to playlists that are really long this way I don’t have to stop what I am doing to figure out what to play next. Sometimes it’s a mix of different artists and sometimes I pick one artist and listen to every album that band or artist ever did. But my taste in music is all over the place. I LOVE Jimi Hendrix, Bob Marley, and Bob Dylan. But I also listen to a lot of electronicia. I am a huge fan of Bassnectar.
GH:
Lastly, who are some of your favorite artists and why?
SW:
Let me give you a shorted version, otherwise we would be here all day.
Of the artists that are alive today I would say Alex Grey’s work is inspirational for a number of reasons. I think that he is amazing at capturing your imagination. I love his attention to detail and the subjects that he chooses to depict are usually packed with symbolism and spirit, all of which I love. Another living artist that blows my mind is Fred Tomaselli. Tomaselli inspires me on many levels. We share a love for the same medium. It was after seeing a show by him at the James Cohan Gallery in NYC, 2006 that I was inspired to use resin in my process. Beside the fact that his work is transcendental and beautiful, he is also very successful. That gives me hope as a fellow collage artist, I look up to him. I also love the work of Mathew Barney. In the midst of all that Vaseline, he still manages to be so incredibly prolific. His body of work is beyond my comprehension. Everything he does seems so weird yet so beautiful. He turns my imagination up to eleven.
Of all the great dead artists out there, two come to mind right away. Salvador Dali and Mati Klarwein. Dali painted the most visionary and beautiful surrealist paintings that anyone has ever seen. His paintings leave you with a feeling of amazement, and on top of that the man himself was art. He could have been a character in one of Matthew Barney’s movies. I am forever grateful for the never-ending fountain of inspiration he left us all. Mati Klarwein. If I were a painter, I would paint in the style of Mati. To me his paintings are like collages. This is not the only reason why I am drawn to his work. Much like Alex Grey, he has a way of transporting me. His attention to detail never fails to amaze me. His subject matter is mystical and shamanic. It holds all the qualities of a true visionary.

Studio Visit: Sebastian Wahl

New York is a wonderful place for an artist to be inspired and live without boundaries. We got the opportunity to visit Sebastian Wahl in his natural element this past year. His art studio has the most amazing view of Harlem I’ve ever seen, plus what a beautiful and spacious environment to create large resin collages. Check out some pictures he sent over straight from The Big Apple, plus a promo video for his upcoming exhibition Kaleidoscope Eyes opening February 5th, 2011, from 6-10pm.

Subway to Sebastian Wahl's studio

Bronx subway to Sebastian Wahl’s studio

Onward studio

View from Sebastian's studioView of the Bronx from Sebastian’s studio

Flower of LifeFlower of Life

Winter time in New York CityWinter time in New York City.

Sebastian WahlSebastian Wahl, self portrait.

Essentials to making the perfect resin concoction. Essentials to making the perfect resin concoction.

Blow torch

The Shrine

Studio view

hands and beautiful paperArtists hands are so interesting to me, Sebastian always has the most beautiful rings.

Bees

Jimi Hendrix InspirationJimi Hendrix Inspiration

Kaleidoscope Eyes resin collagesKaleidoscope Eyes resin collages getting ready to head over to Gallery Hijinks.

Supplies and Tools.Supplies and Tools.

tennis shoes

CratesCrates are ready to come to San Francisco!!!

Gallery Hijinks · 2309 Bryant Street · San Francisco, CA 94110-2810
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